Associate Professor 

groff@temple.edu
(215)204-5164
531 Gladfelter Hall
website

Keywords

Crime and place, Modeling geographical influences on human activity, Agent-based modeling , Crime prevention, Technology in policing

Biography

She has a Ph.D. in Geography (2006) and an MA (2005) in Criminology and Criminal Justice from the University of Maryland, College Park and a BS (1992) and MA (1994) in Geography from the University of North Carolina at Charlotte. As you might imagine Elizabeth is no stranger to applied research. In fact she has spent the last twenty years applying geographic theory and methodology to the study of crime-related issues at both the local and national levels.

At the local level, she institutionalized the use of geographic information systems (GIS) at the Charlotte-Mecklenburg Police Department. At the national level, Dr. Groff ran the NIJ Crime Mapping Research Center from 2001-02 where she promoted the analytic use of mapping in criminal justice agencies. For the next five years she was a Senior Research Associate at the non-profit criminal justice research firm, Institute for Law and Justice where she conducted a variety of research initiatives including the development of an agent-based simulation model of robbery, the application of mobility triangles to understanding homicide, and an evaluation of efficiency, effectiveness, and enabling impacts of COPS MORE funding.

As an early innovator in the use of GIS within law enforcement agencies, she has focused on developing evidence to improve police practice. Groff’s research has revealed which type of map communicates crime information without increasing fear (Groff, Kearley, Beatty, Couture, & Wartell, 2005), the efficacy of foot patrol for reducing violent crime if deployed at small, high crime places in sufficient strength (Ratcliffe, Taniguchi, Groff, & Wood, 2011), and that commanders are able to increase patrol at hot spots when they are provided with reports documenting the level of patrol achieved (Weisburd, Groff, Jones, Amendola and Cave, 2012). These important findings have natural implications for police practice and policy.

Selected Publications

Books:

  • Weisburd, D., Groff, E.R. and S.M. Yang. 2012. The Criminology of Place: Street Segments and Our Understanding of the Crime Problem. Oxford University Press. London.

Selected articles since 2014:

  • Weisburd, D., Braga, Anthony A., Groff, E.R. and A. Wooditch. 2017. Can Hot Spots Policing Reduce Crime in Urban Areas? An Agent-Based Simulation. Criminology. 55 (1), 137-173.
  • Tower, S.M. and E.R. Groff. 2016. Examining the Disorder-crime Connection in Philadelphia Parks. Security Journal. 9(3), 520-537. Published in hard copy 7/2016.
  • Haberman, C., Groff, E.R., Ratcliffe, J.R. and E. Sorg. 2016. Satisfaction with Police in Violent Crime Hot Spots: Using Community Surveys as a Guide for Selecting Hot Spot Policing Tactics. Crime and Delinquency. 62(4), 525-557.
  • Weisburd, D., Groff, E., Jones, G., Cave, B., Amendola, K., Yang, S. and R. Emison. 2015. The Dallas Patrol Management Experiment: Can AVL Technologies be Used to Harness Unallocated Patrol Time For Crime Prevention? Journal of Experimental Criminology. 11(3), 367-391.
  • Ratcliffe, J.R., Groff, E.R., Sorg, E. and C. Haberman. 2015. Citizens’ Reactions to Hot Spots Policing: Experimental Impacts on Perceptions of Crime, Disorder, Fear and Police. Journal of Experimental Criminology. 11(3), 393-417.
  • Groff, E.R., Ratcliffe, J.R., Haberman, C., Sorg, E., Joyce, N., and R. Taylor. 2015. Does What Police Do at Hot Spots Matter?: The Philadelphia Policing Tactics Experiment. Criminology 53(1), 23-53.
  • Groff, E.R. 2014. Quantifying the Exposure of Street Segments to Drinking Places Nearby. Journal of Quantitative Criminology. 30(3):527-548.
  • Hibdon, J. and E.R. Groff. 2014. What You Find Depends on Where You Look: Using Emergency Medical Services Call Data to Target Illicit Drug Use Hot Spots. Journal of Contemporary Criminal Justice 30(2): 169-185.
  • Groff, E.R. and B.L. Lockwood. 2014. Criminogenic Facilities and Crime across Street Segments in Philadelphia: Uncovering Evidence about the Spatial Extent of Facility Influence. Journal of Research in Crime and Delinquency 51(3): 277-314.

 Courses Taught

  • CJ8330: SEMINAR IN ADVANCED CJ RESEARCH TOPICS (ADVANCED GEOSPATIAL METHODS)
  • CJ8330: SEMINAR IN ADVANCED CJ RESEARCH TOPICS (INTRODUCTION TO SIMULATION MODELING)
  • CJ3402: INTRODUCTION TO ENVIRONMENTAL CRIMINOLOGY
  • CJ3402: INTRODUCTION TO ENVIRONMENTAL CRIMINOLOGY – HONORS
  • CJ4102: COMMUNITIES AND CRIME PREVENTION