Department Awards

Joseph F. Beam Scholarship

Established by Dorothy S. Beam, EDU ’72, in memory of her son, this scholarship is awarded to a student in the Creative Writing Program who has demonstrated academic achievement and financial need, and has submitted an essay or literary piece that would be of interest and importance to sexual minorities.

The Dr. Laura S. Dabundo Graduate Award

Established in 2013 by Laura S. Dabundo, Ph.D. ’87, this award is given to an English graduate student exemplifying great academic promise through course work or essay. Preference will be given to a student with financial need studying English Romanticism. This award is made possible through a generous donation by Dr. Laura S. Dabundo, who earned her Ph.D. in English from Temple in 1987. Dr. Dabundo is currently Professor of English, Emerita, at Kennesaw State University.

Fall 2015 Recipient
Darla Himeles

Fall 2014 Recipient
Daniel Nutters

Fall 2013 Recipient
Colleen Kropp

Newton and Beebe Essay Awards

Every year, students in the English graduate programs are eligible to compete for the Richard Newton Prize, given for the best graduate student essay on pre-1900 literature or culture, and for the Maurice Beebe Prize, given for the best essay on twentieth-century literature or culture. Essays should be ones written for a graduate seminar in the previous twelve months. Winners receive a faculty commitment to assist in revising the essay for publication. Copies of the most recent winning essays are available in the Graduate Office for reading.

2014-2015 Recipients

Beebe Award
Elizabeth Kim, “Drawing from the Immaterial: Alison Bechdel’s Invented Archive in Fun Home”

Newton Award
Elizabeth White, “Confronting Slavery: Biopolitics and Cugoano’s Thoughts and Sentiments”

2013-2014 Recipients

Beebe Award
Christian Rupertus, “Wanja as Warrior: Transcendency and Revolution Through National Allegory in Petals of Blood.”

Newton Award
Stephen Kelly, “‘The Forbidding Coast”: Social Tourism and Social Exclusion in Sarah Orne Jewett’s The County of the Pointed Firs.”

2012-2013 Recipients

Beebe Award
Christopher Winkler, “‘An antre more private than a bedroom even’: On W.H. Auden’s Late Style”

Newton Award
Tiffany DeRewal, “Of Riots and Resurrectionists: Medicine’s Gothic History in Colonial Philadelphia”

2011-2012 Recipients

Beebe Award
Edward Howell, “Evaluating Ecocriticism: Literary Value and Environmental Crisis”

Newton Award
Edward Howell, “A Better Illusion: George Eliot’s Impressions of Theophrastus Such and the Idea of a Nation”

2010-2011 Recipients

Beebe Award
Sara Wilson, “Chronic Emeritus: Murphy’s Defense”

Newton Award
Donovan Tann, “Subjectivity, the Body, and Community Membership in Taylor’s Preparatory Meditations”

Travel Fund Awards

The English Graduate Travel Fund provides support to graduate students for activities such as attending conferences and traveling to do research at collections, rare book libraries, or other archives. While the amounts awarded to students will vary depending upon the specific needs of the students, the cost of travel, and the relative importance of the trip to the student’s professional development, as well as on the number of applications received, awards typically average up to $300 for travel to a conference and up to $500 for research at an archive. Other forms of support will also be considered. Applications are accepted on a rolling basis throughout the year, and should include a brief description of your project and/or professional goals, a proposal for the use of funds that explains its importance to your professional development or research project, and a projected budget. Generally, a student will only be awarded funds for one conference or travel to collections in a year, though in exceptional circumstances a second award may be considered. Proposals should be submitted to Sharon Logan in the graduate office, and they will be reviewed by the Graduate Executive Committee (GEC) at its next scheduled meeting. Applications should be received at least two weeks prior to the trip, and travel receipts must be submitted after the trip to receive reimbursement.

College Awards

CLA Advanced Graduate Scholar Award
Juliana Rausch (Spring 2016)
Caitlin Hudgins (Spring 2015)
Beth Seltzer (2014-2015)
Leslie Allison (2012-2013)

CHAT Graduate Associate Fellowship
Jody Griffith (2014)
Daniel Nutters (2014)
Jennifer McKim (2012)
Daniel Morse (2012)
Nicole Cesare (2011)
Jessica Lewis-Turner (2011)
Daniel Morse (2010)
Gabriel Cutrufello (2010)

CHAT Digital Humanities Scholars
Jaclyn Partyka (2014-2015)
Edward Howell (2014-2015)
Beth Seltzer (2013-2014)

University Awards

Temple University Dissertation Completion Grant
Caitlin Hudgins
Jaclyn Partyka
Donovan Tann
Jon Gagas
Jennifer McKim
Dan Morse
Nicole Cesare
Nick Moudry

Graduate Student Accomplishments

Publications

Elizabeth Berlinger

  • Associate Editor, Contrary Magazine (www.contrarymagazine.com), 2007-Present
  • “An Inclusive Poetic World,” book review of Underdog, by Katrina Roberts, Contrary Magazine (Fall 2011)
  • “Poems that Bridge Rational and Mystical,” book review of Northerners by Seth Abramson, Contrary Magazine (Summer 2011)
  •  “Once Upon a Time and Again,” book review of Horse, Flower, Bird by Kate Bernheimer, Contrary Magazine (Winter 2010)

Nicole Cesare

  • “‘How Did I End Up Here?’: Dynamic Cartography in Dinaw Mengestu’s The Beautiful Things that Heaven Bears.” ARIEL: A Review of International English Literature 46.3 July 2015: 113-136.
  • “Strange[r] Encounters: I Do Not Come to You by Chance and the Rhetoric of 419. The Journal of Commonwealth and Postcolonial Studies 1.1 Spring 2013: 82-99.

Meredith Collins

  •  “Fairy and Faerie: Uses of the Victorian in Neil Gaiman’s and Charles Vess’s Stardust.” ImageTexT 2008.

Gabriel Cutrufello

  • “The Public Address and the Rhetoric of Science: Henry Rowland, Epideictic Speech, and Nineteenth-Century American Science.” Rhetoric Review. July-September 2015. 34.3.
  • Review of Things Don’t Like Me: Paranoia, McCarthyism and Colonialism in the Novels of Philip K. Dick. Extrapolation 50.1 (Spring 2009).
  • Review of Gateways to Forever: The Story of the Science-Fiction Magazine from 1970 to 1980. Extrapolation 49.2 (Summer 2008).
  • Review of The Years of Smashing Bricks. American Book Review 29.5 (July/August  2008).

Tiffany DeRewal

  • “The Resurrection and the Knife: Protestant Cadavers and the Rise of American Medicine.” Literature and Medicine 32.2 (Fall 2014). (special issue, “Religion and Medicine in American Literature”).

Adam Fieled

  • “Twenty-First Century Poetry and Poetics.” Poetry Salzburg Review 2010.
  • “Apparition Poems.” & Now Awards Anthology. Lake Forest College Press, 2009
  • Chimes. Blazevox, 2009.
  • The White Album. Ungovernable Press, 2009.
  • When You Bit… Otoliths, 2008.

Jon Gagas

  • Review of Kristin Bluemel, ed., Intermodernism: Writing and Culture in Interwar and Wartime Britain (2010). Pennsylvania Literary Journal (Summer 2010).
  • Review of Scott Slovic, Going Away to Think: Engagement, Retreat, and Ecocritical  Responsibility (2008). The Schuylkill (Spring 2010).

Jody Griffith

  • “Constructing Ordinary Time in Adam Bede: The Architectural Structure of Eliot’s Realism.” Studies in the Novel. (forthcoming March, 2016)

Kate Huber

  • Edited Lore: An E-Journal for Teachers of Writing “Special Issue on the Intersection of Literature and Composition” (Spring 2009).

Sarah Gardam

  • “Subverting the Male Gaze: Willa Cather’s Lena Lingard and William Faulkner’s Lena Grove.” Violence, the Arts, and Willa Cather. Eds. Joseph R. Urgo and Merrill Maguire Skaggs. Madison, NJ: Farleigh Dickenson UP, 2007.
  • “Maggots in the Rice: Women as a Sex Class in Maxine Hong Kingston’s The Woman Warrior.” Narratives of Community: Women’s Short Story Sequences. Ed. Roxanne Harde. Newcastle upon Tyne, England: Cambridge Scholars; 2007. 286-304.
  •  “’Defaulting to the Oldest Scar’: A Psychoanalytic Investigation of Subjectivity in Anne Enright’s The Gathering.” Etudes Irelandaises, 2009 Spring; 34 (1): 99-112.
  •  “Maxine Hong Kingston’s The Woman Warrior as Mahayana Buddhist Meditation.” Encountering Buddhism. Eds. Lawrence Normand and Alison Winch. New York: Continuum, 2013.
  • “ ‘Sound Apples, Fair Flesh, and Sunlight’:  A.S. Byatt’s Feminist Critique of Matisse’s Depictions of Women.” The Language of Images. Cambridge Scholars Press, 2014.
  • Critical Introduction to The Rice-Sprout Song by Eileen Chang, for Literature as Propaganda volume. Thomas Riggs and Co., 2013.
  • Critical Introduction to “New Year’s Sacrifice” by Lu Xun, for Literature as Propaganda volume. Thomas Riggs and Co., 2013.
  • Critical Introduction to The White-Haired Girl by Yan Jinxuan, for Literature as Propaganda volume. Thomas Riggs and Co., 2013.
  • Critical Introduction to Red Crag by Luo Guangbin and Yang Yiyan, for Literature as Propaganda volume. Thomas Riggs and Co., 2013.
  • Critical Introduction to “Yan’an Talks on Literature and Art” by Mao Zedong, for Literature as Propaganda volume. Thomas Riggs and Co., 2013.

Darla Himeles

  • “Weaving,” 5 AM (Fall 2013).
  • “Egg White” and “Conception Poem: Spring,” The Lake Rises: Poems to and for Our Bodies of Water, Eds. Brandi Katherine Herrera and Lisa Wujnovich, published by Stockport Flats, 2013.
  • “Being Gemini,” Weave Magazine, Winter 2014.
  • “June Vision,” OVS, Fall 2014.

Janina Levine

  • “Empathy, Cuckoldry, and the Helper’s Vicarious Imagination in Ulysses,” James Joyce Quarterly, 50.3 (Spring 2013), pp. 635-54.
  • “Weak Plots in the Modernist Novel,” Review of Stephen Kern’s The Modernist Novel: A Critical Introduction, Journal of Modern Literature (Winter 2014).
  • “Passing on the Theme of Creative Renewal to Joye’s Readers,” Review of Renascent Joyce, ed. Daniel Ferrer and Sam Slote, Journal of Modern Literature (Winter 2015).

Janet Neigh

  • “The Lickle Space of the Tramcar in Louise Bennett’s Feminist Postcolonial Poetics.” Critical Perspectives on Louise Bennett.  Special issue of The Journal of West Indian Literature 17.2 (2009): 5-19.

Dan Nutters

  • “Blanchot Drunk,” forthcoming. Contemporary Fiction After Literature. Ed. Ranjan Ghosh (Evanston: Northwestern UP).
  • “Henry James and the Sublime.” Arizona Quarterly 71.2 (Summer 2015): 87-120.
  • “The ‘Whole’ Conduct of Life: Ralph Waldo Emerson and Henry James,” forthcoming. A Power to Translate the World: Emerson and International Culture. Eds. Ricardo Miguel Alfonso and David LaRocca. New Hampshire: Dartmouth UP. 2015.
  • “Back to Beginnings: Edward Said Between Aesthetics and Politics.” The Geocritical Legacies of Edward Said: Space, Narrative, and the Postcolonial. Ed. Robert T. Tally Jr. (London: Palgrave Macmillan, 2015): 83-100.
  • “Between the Romance and the Real: Experiencing Jamesian Reading.” Henry James Review 35.1 (Winter 2014): 12-22.
  • “The Abysses in James Studies.” “The Abysses in James Studies.” Henry James Review 36.1 (Winter 2015): 92-100. Review of Leonardo F. Lisi, Marginal Modernity: The Aesthetics of Dependency from Kierkegaard to Joyce. Dennis Tredy, Annick Duperray, and Adrian Harding, eds, Henry James and the Poetics of Duplicity.
  • “The Critic and the Fat Girl.” Journal of Modern Literature 38.1 (Fall 2014). Review of Charles Altieri, Wallace Stevens and the Demands of Modernity: Toward a Phenomenology of Value.
  • “The Disappearing Future of Theory.” the b2 review. Review of Claire Colebrook, Tom Cohen, and J. Hillis Miller, eds, Theory and the Disappearing Future: On De Man, On Benjamin. (http://boundary2.org/2013/05/20/the-disappearing-future-of-theory-review-by-daniel-nutters/)

John David Schell

  • “Engaging Foundational Narratives in Morrison’s Paradise and Pynchon’s Mason & Dixon” College Literature, Volume 41, Number 3, Summer 2014, pp. 69-94

Beth Seltzer

  • “Fictions of Order in the Timetable: Railway Guides, Comic Spoofs, and Lady Audley’s Secret” (Victorian Review, Spring 2015). Winner of the Hamilton Prize for Best Graduate Student Essay in the Field of Victorian Studies (Victorian Studies Association of Western Canada).

Megan Walsh

  •  “A Nation in Sight:  Charles Willson Peale and the Politics of Vision.” Early American Literature, Fall 2010.
  • “Benjamin Franklin’s ‘Double Spectacles.’”  A Companion to Benjamin Franklin. Ed. David Waldstreicher.  Oxford:  Blackwell Publishing. Forthcoming, Spring 2011.
  • “Charles Willson Peale.”  Encyclopedia of American Studies.  Ed. Miles Orvell. Johns Hopkins University Press, 2008.

Amy Woodworth

  • “Stylish Emotions: Postfeminism, the New Man, and the Male Weepie of the 1990s.” Foregrounding Postfeminism and the Future of Feminist Film and Media Studies. Ed. Marcelline Block. Cambridge Scholars Publishing.

Conference Papers Presented

Elizabeth Berlinger

  • “Sentence Structure in Real Time,” New Jersey College English Association Annual Conference (April 2014)
  • “The Literary Museum as Literacy Narrative,” Collaboration and Conversation: Annual Conference on the Teaching of Writing, University of Connecticut, Storrs (April 2013)
  • “Personal Collections: Literary Museums and Literacy Narratives,” And Gladly Teach? Conference, University of Delaware, Wilmington (April 2013)
  • ‘On the Waterfront’: A National Endowment for the Humanities Workshop on Brooklyn’s Historic Shore,” New Jersey College English Association Annual Conference (March 2013)
  • “Visualizing Literacy Narratives in Writing and Literature Classes,” Transitions and Transactions: Literature Pedagogy in Community Colleges Conference (April 2012)
  • Co-Presenter, “Renewing Teaching and Learning: Contemplative Practices in Higher Education,” National Council of Teachers of English 2010 Annual Convention (November 2010)
  • Presenter, “The ‘Daily Pages’ in the Composition and Journalism Classroom,” Israel Forum for Academic Writing/MOFET Conference: Academic Writing and Beyond in Multicultural Societies, Tel Aviv, Israel (July 2010)
  • “Teaching Writers, Writers Teaching: The Daily Pages,” Modern Language Association (MLA) 2009 Annual Convention, Philadelphia, Pennsylvania, December 27-30, 2009.

Meredith Collins

  • “Pleasure and Identity: Homosexuality as Identity in Victorian Pornography,” Interdisciplinary Nineteenth Century Studies, Saratoga Springs, April 24-26, 2009.
  • “A Hylo-Idealistic Romance of Duty: Courtship in Oscar Wilde’s Short Fiction,” Pacific Ancient and Modern Language Association Annual Meeting, Bellingham, November 2-3, 2007.
  • “Masculinity, Neurasthenia and Decadence: Anxieties in Frank Norris’s Vandover and the Brute and Oscar Wilde’s The Picture of Dorian Gray,” Men and Madness, Manchester, UK, June 28-30, 2007

Gabriel Cutrufello

  • “Remixing the Report: The Writing Center Database and the Rise of the Digital Student,” Conference on College Composition and Communication, Louisville, Kentucky, March 2010.
  • “Abstract Science and Communication: The Creation of Modern Physical Chemistry and Learning to Talk About It,” Modern Language Association, Philadelphia, Pennsylvania, December 2009.
  • “Writing Center Tutor Use of Database Materials in Tutoring,” Mid-Atlantic Writing Centers Association Conference, York, PA, March 2009.

Tiffany DeRewal

  • “Necrophiladelphia: Seeing, Hearing, and Remembering the Dead in the City of Brotherly Love.” American Comparative Literature Association (ACLA) National Conference, NYU. Spring 2014.
  • “Invasion of the Bodysnatcher: Medical Students, Gothic Novels, and the Contest for the Corpse in Antebellum America.” Museum of Morbid Anatomy. Brooklyn, NY. Summer 2014 (Invited Lecture).

Jon Gagas

  • “Psychic and Cultural Disintegration: The Holocaust’s Division of High and Late Modernism in Europe.” Representing World War II, Genocide, the Holocaust panel, Modernist Studies Association’s 16th annual conference, Pittsburgh, 11/08/13.
  • “The Structure of Prophetic Vision in Songs of Innocence and of Experience: Reading Blake with Badiou,” Northeast Modern Language Association, Montreal, April 10, 2010.
  • “Vision and Historical Consciousness in John Banville’s The Book of Evidence,” New Jersey College English Association, Seton Hall University, South Orange, NJ, March 21, 2009.
  • “From Novelist to Prophet: The Development of D.H. Lawrence’s Fiction, 1920-1930,” New Jersey College English Association, Seton Hall University, South Orange, NJ, March 29, 2008.

Sarah Gardam

  • “Subverting the Male Gaze: Willa Cather’s Lena Lingard and William Faulkner’s Lena Grove.” Violence, the Arts, and Cather: the 10th International Cather Seminar in Red Cloud, Nebraska (June 2005).
  • “Subverting the Male Gaze: Willa Cather’s Lena Lingard and William Faulkner’s Lena Grove.” Southern Writers, Southern Writing: Annual Graduate Conference in Oxford, Mississippi (July 2005).
  • “Floods of Desire: Young Women on the City Streets of Sister Carrie and Night and Day” Seventh Annual Modern Studies Association Conference Roundtable in Chicago, Illinois (November 2005).
  • “The Mysterious Owl as Complex Power Source in Rudolfo Anaya’s Bless Me, Ultima and Sandra Cisneros’ “The Eyes of Zapata.” College English Association Annual Conference in San Antonio, Texas (April 2006)
  • A Hunger for Lost Paradise: Tracing the Notion of Correspondence through the Synesthetic Language of Baudelaire, the Late-Victorians, and H.D.” 8th Annual Modern Studies Association Conference Seminar in Tulsa, Oklahoma (October 2006).
  • ” ‘Sound Apples, Fair Flesh, and Sunlight’: A.S. Byatt’s Feminist Critique of Matisse’s Depictions of Women.” The Language of Images Text and Image Conference at Central Connecticut State University in New Britain, CT (March 2007).
  • “Vanity, Chivalry, and Desire in Willa Cather’s The Professor’s House” at Willa Cather: a Writer’s Worlds, 11th International Cather Seminar in Paris and Provence, France (June 2007).
  • “Climbing Into Buried Love’s Grave: Reading for Identification in Richard Powers’ Galatea 2.2.” An Investigation of Modern Love: International Conference at the Durrell School of Corfu, Greece (May 2008).
  • “The Leanness of Hope in Asian American Literature: Aesthetic Resistance to Ideology in John Okada’s No-No Boy and Wendy Law-Yone’s The Coffin Tree.” Bodies in Motion: The University of Rhode Island’s Third Annual Interdisciplinary Graduate Conference (March 2009).
  • “The Leanness of Hope in Asian American Literature: Aesthetic Resistance to Ideology in John Okada’s No-No Boy and Wendy Law-Yone’s The Coffin Tree.” Fabricating the Body: Race and the Body Special Session at M/MLA in Missouri (November 2009).
  • “Living Out of the Self: Barbara Guest, Screening the Heroic ‘I’” at The Tulsa School poetry conference in Tulsa, Oklahoma (November, 2009).
  • “The Aesthetics of Insight: Buddhism and Tragedy in Asian American Literature.” Annual joint meeting of the Association for Multi-Ethnic Literatures of the United States (MELUS) and the United States chapter of the Association for Commonwealth Literature and Language Studies (USACLALS), San Jose, California (April 19-22, 2012).
  • “Tragedy and Transnationalism in Asian American Literature.” Annual joint meeting of the Association for Multi-Ethnic Literatures of the United States (MELUS) and the United States chapter of the Association for Commonwealth Literature and Language Studies (USACLALS), San Jose, California (April 19-22, 2012).
  • “Tragic Heroines in Asian American Literature.” Northeast Modern Language Annual Conference, Rochester, NY (March 15-18, 2012).

Jody Griffith

  • “Ruskin’s Museum: Glass Ceilings and the Oxford Museum of Natural History.” Presented at the 2014 Annual Meeting of the American Comparative Literature Association, New York City, New York.
  • “The lock and key that kept him in, kept numbers of his troubles out”: Obedience and freedom within Little Dorrit’s walls. Will be presented at the 2014 Annual Meeting of the Society for Science Literature and Art, Dallas, TX.
  • “Obedience or Freedom?: Architectural Structure in Dickens’s Little Dorrit” Architecture and the Built Environment panel. Will be presented 2014 Annual Conference of the Mid-
    Atlantic Popular & American Culture Association, Baltimore, MD.

Ted Howell

  • “The Earth Beating Time: Howards End in the Anthropocene.” Society for Novel Studies conference at the University of Utah on April 5th.

Caitlin Hudgins

  • “Staging Victory and Fleeing the Scene: Grounding Imagination in Américo Paredes’ George Washington Gómez.” Society for the Study of Multi-Ethnic Literature of the United States Conference. Oklahoma City, Oklahoma (March 2014)
  • “Cultivating Imaginative Investigation in Willa Cather’s O Pioneers!” Western Literature Association Conference.  Berkeley, California (October 2013)

Jessica Lewis-Turner

  • “The Queer Mouth of Ralph Werther,” Writings of Intimacy in the Twentieth and Twenty-First Centuries Conference, Loughborough University, Leicestershire, UK, September 2010.
  • “Less Gay, More Queer: Willa Cather’s My Antonia,” Pacific Ancient and Modern Language Association Conference, San Francisco, CA, November 6-7, 2009.Rita Mookerjee
  • Midatlantic American and Popular Culture Association Annual Conference 2014

Daniel Morse

  • “Akashvani Hai: Midnight’s Children and Broadcasting Ethics.” 11th Annual Modernist Studies Association Conference, Montreal, November 2009.
  • “Only Connecting” E. M. Forster and Empire Broadcasting.” Penn Program on Democracy, Citizenship, and Constitutionalism, University of Pennsylvania, November 2009.

Dan Nutters

  • “Trilling and Said Between Aesthetics and Politics.” MLA Special Session: The Politics of Literature. MLA. Vancouver, BC. January 2015.
  • “The Man of Imagination: Henry James, Reading, and the Humanities.” NeMLA. Harrisburg, PA. April 2014.
  • “The Sublime Act of Reading: Keats and Stevens.” NeMLA. Harrisburg, PA. April 2014.
  • “Back to Beginnings: Edward Said Between Aesthetics and Politics.” ACLA. New York, NY. March 2014.
  • “The New Americanist Jeremiad.” MLA Special Session: “Newer New or Coming After? Americanist Literary Criticism at the Present Moment.” MLA. Chicago, IL. January 2014.

Abigail Orenstein

  • “Ethnography of Tree House Books: A Neighborhood Literacy Center”, Panel: “Alignment and Assessment as Gateways: High School, Community College, Neighborhood, University,” Conference on College Composition and Communication, St. Louis, MO, March 2012.
  • “Refugees of the Upper West Side: Oral Narratives of German Jews after 1938″, Panel of “Narrating Europe’s [Dis]Integration in Literature, Cinema, and Speech,” Northeast MLA Conference, Rochester, NY, March 2012.

Jaclyn Partyka

  • “Nabokov’s Doppelganger: Celebrity Authorship and the Fictionalization of the Literary Marketplace.” Northeast Modern Language Association Conference, Susquehanna University, 2014.
  • “The Author’s Doppelganger: Nabokov’s Autobiographic-Metafiction.” International Conference on Narrative, Massachusetts Institute of Technology, 2014.
  • “‘Today’s Lesson’: Paratextual Instruction in Yamina Bachir-Chouikh’s Rachida.” Global Fusion 2011: Power, Resistance, and the Media, Temple University, 2011.

Elizabeth Seltzer

  • “Ambiguous Images in The Mystery of Edwin Drood” (MLA 2015)
  • “Indeterminacy, Interactivity, and the Many Ends of Edwin Drood” (MLA 2015)
  • “The Evolution of an Industry: Historical Trends in Austen Adaptation,” Northeast Modern Language Association Conference, Montreal, April 7-11, 2010.

Shiladitya Sen

  •  “Teaching the Bible: The Book of Genesis as Translated Text.” Modern Language Association (MLA) 2009 Annual Conference, Philadelphia, December 27-30, 2009.

Sara Wilson

  • “Preference for the Ginger Biscuit: Cuisine and the Self in Beckett and Orwell” Northeast Modern Language Association Conference, Susquehanna University, April 2014
  • “Ulysses on Trial: Publishing, Paratext, Context,” Northeast Modern Language Association Conference, Tufts University, March 2013

Amy Woodworth

  • “The Great Man Weepie: Masochism, Male Melodrama, and Feminism.” Society for Cinema and Media Studies Annual Conference, Los Angeles, March 17-21, 2010.

Fellowships

Megan Walsh

  • Robert M. & Annetta J. Coffelt Fellowship at the John D. Rockefeller, Jr. Library, Colonial Williamsburg Foundation, 2009-2010
  • Research Associateship, McNeil Center for Early American Studies at the University of Pennsylvania, 2009-2010
  • CHAViC Summer Seminar Grant, Center for the History of American Visual Culture at the American Antiquarian Society, 2009 (declined)
  • Society of Early Americanists Travel Grant, 2009
  • Winterthur Research Fellowship, Winterthur Museum, Library, and Country Estate, 2008-2009
  • MCEAS Consortium Dissertation Fellowship, McNeil Center for Early American Studies at the University of Pennsylvania, 2008-2009

Christine Webster

  • Princeton University’s Mid-career Fellowship Program. Researched student-retention and created an “express” course for college students who require development reading. September 2011-May 2012.Center for the Humanities at Temple (CHAT) Fellowships

Awards

Elizabeth Berlinger

  • Selected participant, Digital Storytelling grant, Borough of Manhattan Community College (Summer 2014)
  • Enhanced Learning in the Classroom grant, Borough of Manhattan Community College (Spring 2014)
  • City University of New York Salute to Scholars Award (December 2012)
  • National Endowment for the Humanities Summer Scholar, Landmarks in American History Summer Workshop: Along the Shore: Changing and Preserving the Landmarks of Brooklyn’s Industrial Waterfront (June 2012)Sarah Gardam
  • First-Year Writing Program Outstanding Instructor Award (May 2012)
  • Teaching and Learning Center Fellowship (Fall 2011-Spring 2013)Darla Himeles
  • “After a Faraway Friend Saves My Mind” won second prize in the 2013 Maine Postmark Poetry Contest. Reading at the awards ceremony in Belfast, Maine, in October 2013 was broadcast on local radio.

Caitlin Hudgins

  • First-Year Writing Program Outstanding Instructor Award, Temple University (2012)
  • Vision & Rationality Rome Summer Seminar Scholarship, Temple University (2009)

Laurenelise Kadel

  • First-Year Writing Program Outstanding Instructor Award (2013)

Rita Mookerjee

  • Kenneth E. Williams Memorial Award recipient (2013)

Abigail Orenstein

  • First-Year Writing Program Outstanding Instructor Award (2011)

Jaclyn Partyka

  • Distinguished Graduate Student Teaching Award from the College of Liberal Arts at Temple University (2014)
  • First-Year Writing Program Outstanding Instructor Award (2010, 2011)

Nathaniel Racine

  • Temple University Global Studies Graduate Student Research Grant (2015)

Beth Seltzer

  • Winner of the Hamilton Prize for Best Graduate Student Essay in the Field of Victorian Studies (Victorian Studies Association of Western Canada)

Sara Wilson

  • First-Year Writing Program Outstanding Instructor Award (2011)

Media Appearance

Elizabeth Berlinger

  • “From Sappho to Sylvia Plath ” and Beyond,” Interview for Borough of Manhattan Community College Web Site, October 2, 2009.