Undergraduate ProgramSpecial Topics Courses – Fall 2015

History 3296.2

Elections as Historical Turning Points in US History

Professor: Lauren Feldman

Description: This writing-intensive seminar will help students to think critically about American politics and the drama of America elections – presidential and others.  Students will read about and analyze important electoral moments in the history of the United States.  How, we will ask in this class, have these major turning points shaped American history, cultural, society, and politics? The seminar will specifically focus on sharpening students’ writing and original research skills with the completion of a final paper.

History 2280.3

CIA and U.S. Foreign Policy

Professor: Richard Immerman

Description: This course seeks to provide students with greater understanding of the relationship between national intelligence, U.S. foreign policy, and national security.  It examines the role and responsibility of national intelligence and illuminates its history through a detailed assessment of its successes, failure and attempts at reforms.

History (AMB) 3280.101

Black Politics and American Democracy

Instructor: Melanie Newport

This course explores black politics, protest and popular culture in the making of democracy in America.  Within clearly defined social and cultural contexts, we examine the myriad ways African Americans have challenged injustice and defined citizenship.  Through the lived experiences and ideas of particular individuals, the details of cultural and political movements and an analysis of the economic, social and political barriers they challenged, this course provides students with a nuanced reconstruction of American history and society through the lens of black politics.

History 3480

Greek Archaeology

Professor: Michael Eisman

History 3697.1

China and the World in the Age of Empire

Professor: Peter Lavelle

Description: This course examines the history of China from the mid-seventeenth century to the early twentieth century. We chart the rise of China’s last and largest empire, investigate its connections to the global economy, and study the empire’s long and complex demise in a globalizing world. We also examine the emergence of the Chinese nation-state and pay special attention to its connections to world affairs. In studying Chinese history, we consider major themes of significance to historiography, such as imperialism and modernization.

History 3880.1

CUBA: A HISTORY OF WAR, HOPE, AND REVOLUTION 

Professor: Monica Ricketts

This course studies the history of Cuba from the late eighteenth century to the present.  We discuss Cuba’s struggles for independence, the emancipation of slaves, and the War of 1898 that led to Cuban independence from Spain. We examine twentieth-century Cuba from both an international and national perspective, especially in its relationship with the United States and the rest of Latin America. Finally, the course evaluates the Revolution of 1959 and the cultural, socioeconomic, and political transitions experienced in the island today.

History 5280

CIA and U.S. Foreign Policy

Professor: Richard Immerman

Description: This course seeks to provide students with greater understanding of the relationship between national intelligence, U.S. foreign policy, and national security.  It examines the role and responsibility of national intelligence and illuminates its history through a detailed assessment of its successes, failure and attempts at reforms.

History 8800.2

HISTORY AND THE AFRICAN DIASPORA

Professor: Benjamin Talton

Readings in and discussion of the major themes, interpretations and conceptual frameworks in scholarship concerning the African diaspora.  The course emphasizes social and cultural histories of communities of African descent in the Atlantic and Indian Ocean worlds.  In addition to completing weekly reading and writing assignments, and as a final assignment a comparative review essay, students will participate actively in class conversations.