Graduate Specialization

Any graduate student in a Ph.D. program at Temple University can participate in the Neuroscience Program.  A Graduate Specialization in Neuroscience is awarded upon completion of the Ph.D. and is listed on the student’s transcript. The following are the requirements to complete the Graduate Specialization in Neuroscience:

Admission

For an application to the program, please contact the Student Services Coordinator.

Graduate students are admitted to the Program after they have been accepted into a Ph.D. program based on an interest to pursue their research in the neuroscience area. Upon successful completion of their departmental and Neuroscience Program requirements, students receive a Ph.D. degree in the discipline represented by their department with a Specialization in Neuroscience. To fulfill the requirements of the Program, students must pass courses in 2 areas of neuroscience as well as participate in the Neuroscience Program’s Seminars and Journal Clubs for four semesters.

Requirements

Requirements reflect changes made to Specialization in Fall 2014

To be a graduate student in the Neuroscience Program, a student must fulfill the following requirements:

  1. Be a graduate student in good standing in a Temple University Ph.D. program.
  2. Meet all the obligations of the student’s participating department.
  3. Have one member of the Neuroscience Program on their dissertation committee.
  4. Attend and participate at the Journal Club and seminars of the Neuroscience Program for 4 semesters.
  5. Take two course in each of the Neuroscience Specialization Areas:
  •  Behavioral /Cognitive / Systems Neuroscience
  • Cellular/Molecular Neuroscience

The following is a listing of examples of key courses:

As courses are developed, they will be evaluated by a committee and considered

Courses In Behavioral /Cognitive / Systems Neuroscience

  • BIOL 5452 – Systems Neuroscience
  • BIOL 5454 – Neurological Basis of Animal Behavior
  • CSCD 5521 – Foundations in Child Language Disorders
  • CSCD 5526 – Foundations in Adult Language Disorders
  • KINS 5311 – Physiology of Exercise
  • KINS 9301 – Motor Development
  • KINS 9311 – Biomechanics: Human Movement
  • PHIL 8731 – Seminar in the Philosophy of the Mind
  • PHTH 9620 – Human Movement Science I: Neural Factors
  • PHTH 9621 – Human Movement Science III: Cognition and Learning
  • PHTH 9624 – Human Movement Science II: Mechanics and Models
  • PHTH 9651 – Theoretical Foundations of Physical Therapy
  • PSY 8712 – Core Course in Behavioral Neuroscience
  • ECE 5714 – Introduction to Intelligent Systems Engineering
  • NSCI 5001 – Systems and Behavioral Neuroscience

Courses in Cellular/Molecular Neuroscience

  • BIOL 5358 – Cellular/Molecular Neuroscience
  • BIOL 5469 – Molecular Biology
  • BIOL 5476 – General Biochemistry II
  • BIOL 5433 – Advanced Techniques in Microscopy
  • BIOL 5456 – Organization and Development of the Nervous System
  • BMSC 8207 – Molecular Approaches to Research
  • BMSC 8802 – Essentials of Neuroscience
  • BMSC 8803 – Molecular and Cellular Neuroscience
  • BMSC 8804 – Neuropharmacology
  • BMSC 8805 – Pharmacology of Drugs of Abuse
  • BMSC 8806 – Translational Science of Nervous System Diseases
  • MIIM 9306 – Neuroimmunopharmacology
  • PS 8402 – Pharmacodynamics
  • MEE 5732 – Tissue Biomechanics
  • NSCI 5002- Neurochemistry
  • PSY 8005- Affective Neuroscience

To Be Determined By Content (not all topics will count)

  • PSY 8130 – Topical Seminars in BCS
  • PSY 8310- Topical Seminar in Cognitive Psychology
  • PSYCH 8420 Topical Seminars in Clinical Psychology
  • BIOL 8510 – Seminar in Neuroscience
  • BMSC 8810 – Special Topics in Neuroscience