Sandra L. Suárez

438 Gladfelter Hall
1115 Polett Walk


Comparative Politics, American Politics, Comparative Public Policy, Politics of Information and Communications Technology, Executive Compensation, Financial regulation


Sandra L. Suárez (Ph.D., Yale University, 1994) is Professor of Political Science. She specializes in the study of American and Comparative political economy and public policy in historical perspective.

Suarez’ research deals with how political and economic actors shape the policymaking process and its outcomes across countries and over time. She has focused her attention principally on economic policymaking, zeroing in on critical junctures in search of patterns of behavior and interaction among the relevant formal and informal actors. She has conducted research on these topics in both developed and developing countries, employing primarily theory-driven process-tracing and case-study and small-sample methodologies.

She has published work about business-government relationships, especially in the U.S., economic development policies, which involved a historical-comparative study of Ireland, Singapore and Puerto Rico, the politics of the diffusion of the Internet and mobile telecommunications, and the politics of financial regulation and executive compensation. The overarching questions that unite her work are firmly rooted in the political economy tradition: in what ways do governments chose to intervene in the economy, what are the interests of formal and informal actors, and what are the political and economic trade-offs?

Suarez’ work has been published in the Journal of Comparative Politics, Politics & Society, Social Forces, Studies in Comparative International Development and Telecommunications Policy. She has been awarded fellowships by the Ford Foundation, the Center for International Studies at the Woodrow Wilson School, the Institute for the Study of World Politics and the Juan March Foundation, Center for Advance Study in the Social Sciences in Madrid.

Selected Publications

  • Suárez, Sandra L. 2015. Reflections on a “Heavenly Chorus [that] Sings with a Strong [Male] Upper Class Accent.” Business and Politics, vol. 17, issue 1 (April): 161-175.
  • Suárez, Sandra L. 2014. “Symbolic Politics and the Regulation of Executive Compensation: A Comparison of the Great Depression and Great Recession.” Politics & Society, vol. 42 (March): 73-105.
  • Suárez, Sandra L. 2012. “Reciprocal Policy Diffusion: The Regulation of Executive Compensation in the UK and US” Journal of Public Affairs vol. 12, issue 4 (November): 303-314.
  • Suárez, Sandra L. and Robin Kolodny. 2011. “Paving the Road to ‘Too Big To Fail:’ Business Interests and the Politics of Financial Deregulation in the U.S.,” Politics & Society, vol. 39 (March): 74-102.
  • Guillén, Mauro and Sandra L. Suárez. 2010. “The Global Crisis of 2007-2009: Markets, Politics and Organizations” Research in the Sociology of Organizations, vol. 30: 257-79.
  • Suárez, Sandra. L. 2009. “Economic and Fertility Policies In An Era of Globalization: A Comparison of Ireland and Singapore.” New Global Studies (Berkeley Electronic Press), vol. 3, issue 1; 1-26.
  • Suárez, Sandra L. 2006. “Mobile Democracy: Text Messages, Voter Turnout and the 2004 Spanish Elections” Representation vol. 42, no. 2 (July); 117-128.
  • Guillén, Mauro and Sandra L. Suárez. 2006. “Explaining the Global Digital Divide: Economic, Political and Sociological Drivers of Cross-national Internet Use” Social Forces, vol. 84, no. 2 (December); 681-708.
  • Suárez, Sandra L. 2005. “Does English Rule? Language Instruction and Economic Growth Strategies in Singapore, Ireland, and Puerto Rico” Comparative Politics, vol. 37 no. 4 (July); 459-478.
  • Suárez, Sandra L. 2001. “Political and Economic Motivations for Labor Control: A Comparison of Ireland, Puerto Rico, and Singapore.” Studies in Comparative International Development vol. 36 no. 2 (summer); 54-81.
  • Guillén, Mauro and Sandra L. Suárez. 2001. “Developing the Internet: Entrepreneurship and Public Policy in Ireland, Singapore, Argentina, and Spain” with Mauro Guillén, Telecommunications Policy vol. 25 no. 5; 349-371.

Courses Taught

  • Politics of Cyberspace
  • Foreign Governments
  • Business and Politics
  • Comparative Public Policy
  • The Politics of the Global Financial Crisis
  • The Politics of Interests

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