Graduate Handbook

APPROVED BY THE GRADUATE COMMITTEE, June 2008

I. GENERAL STATEMENT

II. AREAS OF SPECIALIZATION 

III.  DEPARTMENTAL COURSE REQUIREMENTS FOR THE PH.D.

IV.  DEPARTMENTAL POLICY REGARDING TRANSFER OF COURSE CREDITS 

V.  DEFINITION OF FULL-TIME STATUS FOR GRADUATE STUDENTS

VI.  ENROLLMENT IN GRADUATE COURSES

VII.  EVALUATION OF STUDENT PROGRESS

VIII. DEPARTMENTAL REQUIREMENTS FOR THE M.A. IN PSYCHOLOGY

IX.  ELEVATION TO CANDIDACY FOR THE PH.D.

X. POLICIES CONCERNING FINANCIAL SUPPORT OF GRADUATE STUDENTS

XI.  GUIDELINES FOR GRADUATE ASSISTANTSHIPS

XII.  DEPARTMENTAL OBLIGATIONS CONCERNING TEACHING ASSISTANTS 

XIII.  DEPARTMENTAL POLICY REGARDING STUDENTS ON FELLOWSHIP SUPPORT

XIV.  PREPARING FOR THE DOCTORAL DISSERTATION

XV.  STUDENT GRIEVANCE PROCEDURES

XVI. SPECIFIC AREA REQUIREMENTS

I. GENERAL STATEMENT

The Department of Psychology offers graduate study leading to the Doctor of Philosophy in a variety of areas.  The Graduate Program is a full-time program of study.  The Department does not admit students for a terminal Master of Arts (M.A.) degree.  Students enrolled in the Ph.D. program may obtain a Master’s degree in General Psychology during the course of their graduate work.

A. Application Deadline

Entrance into the Graduate Program occurs in the Fall semester only. Applications must be received by December 1 for admission in the following year’s Fall semester. A student must apply to one of the six Areas of Specialization but may indicate concentrations of interest on his or her application. Application materials can be obtained online. Click on this link to access forms:

(http://www.temple.edu/grad/admissions/AccessGradApp.htm)

B. Financial Aid

In addition to financial aid awarded through the Graduate School, the Department offers a number of teaching and research assistantships, each of which carries a stipend plus full waiver of tuition and fees.

C. Admission Requirements

Applicants must hold a B.A. or B.S. degree and should have completed at least one laboratory course in psychology and one course in statistics. Laboratory courses in other sciences may under special circumstances substitute for a laboratory course in psychology. All applicants must submit scores from the verbal and quantitative tests of the Graduate Record Examination. Three letters of recommendation are also required.

D. Degree Requirements

Students must complete the number of credits of specified course work required by their Program Area. A minimum of 12 credits (four courses) must come from Ph.D. Core courses and 6 credits (two courses) must be statistics courses. Students must also pass a written and oral Preliminary Examination; submit an acceptable Dissertation; and successfully defend the Dissertation in an oral final examination. Each Area of Specialization within the Department may have additional requirements to those of the Department.

E. Departmental Regulations Governing Graduate Study

This document contains the rules and regulations governing the Department of Psychology’s Graduate Program. Although these rules and regulations comply with those of the Graduate School, the Graduate School may have other rules and regulations with which all graduate students must comply. Students should obtain and familiarize themselves with all Graduate School regulations in addition to those contained in this Document. (Click here for the Graduate School Bulletin:  http://www.temple.edu/grad/policies/gradpolicies.htm).

In many cases of questions concerning requirements, answers can be found either in this book of regulations or in the graduate school regulations. Students and their advisors should approach those sources first. In case of further questions, the appropriate Area or Cluster Director should be contacted.

II. AREAS OF SPECIALIZATION

Areas of study in the Department are grouped into four areas: Brain and Cognitive Sciences (BCS); Developmental; Social; and Clinical.

Within the BCS area, students may pursue doctoral study in one of three Areas of Specialization:

  • • Behavioral and Cognitive Neuroscience
  • • Cognition and Perception
  • • Basic and Applied Behavior Analysis

An Emphasis in Developmental Psychopathology is also available to students who wish to specialize in this focus.

III. DEPARTMENTAL COURSE REQUIREMENTS FOR THE PH.D.

A. General Requirements.

Each Area of Specialization may have coursework requirements for the Ph.D. that are specific to it, as detailed in subsequent sections of this document. However, all students must satisfy the general requirements for the Ph.D. established by the Department of Psychology, as follows:

1. Two semesters of graduate coursework in statistics must be taken in the first year of study.

2. A minimum of four Core Courses must be successfully completed in the first four semesters in residence (five semesters for clinical students).

3. A minimum of 36 didactic course credits must be completed.

4. A minimum residency requirement of one year must be fulfilled.

5. The Psychology department views a grade of B- as the minimally acceptable grade indicating satisfactory progress in graduate courses. No more than two grades lower than “B-” may be earned toward the degree in courses taken after acceptance into the program, and two grades below B- may be grounds for dismissal from the program.

6. A written Preliminary Examination must be approved and defended orally before a committee selected by the student and approved by the Department. (Rules concerning the composition of this committee are discussed later in this document.) No Preliminary Examination may be taken more than twice, in whole or part.

7. A written Dissertation must be approved and defended orally before a committee selected by the student and approved by the Department.

8.  Doctoral Examinations/Culminating Experiences require a minimum of 6 s.h., with at least 2 s.h. of the 6 s.h. required to be in course number 9999.  The remaining 4 s.h. can be a combination of the following course numbers: 9994, 9998, and/or 9999.  At least one of the 9999 credits must be taken in the semester of graduation.

9. Enrollment must be full-time and continuous, except for approved leaves of absence.

10. All degree requirements must be completed within seven years of the beginning of the student’s first semester of full-time study in the Department.

11. No candidate may graduate with an I (incomplete) on his or her record.

l2. All graduate students must have at least a 3.0 grade-point average in order to receive the Ph.D.

13. Attendance in Psychology 8015 (Professional Development Seminar/Teaching of Psychology) is required of all first year graduate students.

 

B. Core Courses

Core Courses are semester-long graduate courses designed to provide students with an introduction to a particular area of psychology at a level appropriate for beginning graduate study. The Core Courses offered by the Department are: Behavioral Neuroscience, Cognitive Psychology, Developmental Psychology, History and Systems, Psychopathology, and Social Psychology. These are offered on a regular and rotating basis, according to a schedule approved by the Graduate Committee. This schedule is made available to graduate students yearly, at the beginning of the fall semester.

All students are required to successfully complete a minimum of four Core Courses within the first four semesters of graduate study (five semesters for Clinical students). The pattern of courses is specified by the student’s Area of Specialization.

Student performance in each Core Course is evaluated by one or more written examinations unless an exception to this policy has been approved by the Graduate Committee. No Core Course credit is received for any grade below B-. (Although Core Course credit is not awarded for a Core Course in which the student receives a grade below B-, the student may receive credit for such a course as an elective.)

C. Elective Courses

Students should consult their Area of Specialization requirements for information on specific elective courses required by their area.  Additional Core Courses, beyond the minimum four that are required, may be counted as elective courses.

D. Directed Readings

Any graduate student wishing to take a Directed Readings course for credit must submit a formal proposal to the Director of Graduate Studies for approval, including a detailed plan of study, before the beginning of the term in question. The proposal should include the following: (a) a course title, (b) a statement of how the course fits into the student’s overall program of study, and (c) the name of the faculty member who has agreed to serve as mentor if the plan is approved. The purpose of a readings course is to provide an opportunity for a student to study a specialized topic that is not represented in the regular curriculum and is unlikely to be presented in a topical seminar. Readings courses will be approved only when a coherent, specialized topic is being investigated, and when the course fills a gap in the curriculum. Readings course credit is not given for the initial exploration of a general area or for the exploratory reading that forms a normal part of the preparation for Dissertation or pre-Dissertation research proposals.

E. Research Credits

Students can register for a maximum of 18 credits of research before being elevated to candidacy. Students who are not elevated to candidacy should register for 9991 Research. Students who have been elevated to candidacy can register for Preliminary Exam Preparation or Dissertation Research, as appropriate (see section V below). All graduate students after elevation to candidacy must complete a minimum of six credits of 9999 Dissertation research with at least 1 credit of Dissertation research in the semester of defense.

Graduate School regulations require that certain research credit course numbers be used when working on the Preliminary Examination or the Dissertation (See section V below).

Please see http://www.temple.edu/grad/policies/gradpolicies.htm for additional details.

F. Research, Teaching, and Clinical Experience

All students should acquire guided experience in research, teaching, and, if enrolled in the Clinical Area, clinical work.

G. Extension of Time for Doctoral Students

All degree requirements must be completed within seven years of the beginning of the student’s first semester of full-time study in the Department. All requests for extensions of time are granted by the Graduate Committee Student Appeals Committee of the Graduate School and must comply with the guidelines published by the Graduate School. The “Extension of Time Request” is available at:

http://www.temple.edu/grad/forms/index.htm.

All requests for extensions of time submitted to the Graduate School must be accompanied by a plan of action and activities that has been approved by the Student’s Doctoral Advisory Committee, and approved in writing by the Director of the student’s Graduate Program, the Psychology Department Graduate Committee, and the Office of the Dean of the College of Liberal Arts. Extensions are granted on a year-by-year basis only. Any student who has received a one-year extension of time to complete the degree from the department Graduate Committee and from the university’s Graduate School must re-petition the Graduate Committee for any further extension of time.

H. Exceptions to Department Regulations

Students may petition the Graduate Committee for any reason, but must petition the Committee for any matters that pertain to deviations from Department regulations, or for which this Document specifies a petition requirement. Students wishing to submit a petition to the Graduate School may download the appropriate forms (“Petition to the Graduate School or to the Graduate School Appeals Committee”) at http://www.temple.edu/grad/forms/index.htm

IV. DEPARTMENTAL POLICY REGARDING TRANSFER OF COURSE CREDITS

The Graduate School permits transfer credits of no more than twenty percent of the total course requirements of the student’s Graduate Program. The “Transfer ofGraduate Credit Request” is available at http://www.temple.edu/grad/forms/index.htm

Transfer of credits is evaluated by the Dean of the Graduate School on a case-by-case basis in consultation with the appropriate Department Chair, Area, or Cluster Director. Individual Areas of Specialization may impose more stringent — but not less stringent — requirements than those imposed by the Graduate School.

The Department of Psychology has the following policies concerning transfer credits:

1. While we permit students to satisfy, by examination, particular program requirements that are typically satisfied through coursework, passing such examinations does not result in course credit. The advantage of fulfilling program requirements through examination is that of greater flexibility in the selection of courses.

2. Students who have completed graduate coursework at Temple prior to their admission to the Graduate Program in Psychology may credit up to 9 hours of such courses toward the graduate degree.

3. A student enrolled in the Graduate Program in Psychology may, with approval of the Director of Graduate Studies, transfer up to 9 credit hours of course credit for courses taken elsewhere. To be so approved, those courses must be deemed appropriate to stand as part of the student’s training in the Ph.D. program, and the student must have received a grade of B- or higher in the course(s). In reviewing the student’s request, the Director of Graduate Studies will consult with the student’s major advisor, the Director of the student’s Graduate Area of Specialization and the faculty members who teach courses that are similar to the proposed transfer courses. Students wishing to transfer course credits taken elsewhere should provide syllabi and other supporting documents that describe the courses.

4. Transfer credit for courses that correspond closely to Core Courses will not count toward satisfaction of the Core Course requirement. In such cases, however, Core Course credit can be obtained through examination.

V. DEFINITION OF FULL-TIME STATUS FOR GRADUATE STUDENTS

To qualify as full-time, a graduate student must satisfy one of the following conditions:

1. A.  To be designated full-time, a graduate student (including all recipients of Graduate School Fellowships) must be enrolled for 9 or more s.h. of coursework until all coursework is completed.
B.  To be designated full-time, a graduate student who holds an Assistantship that requires at least 20 hours of service per week must be enrolled in 6 s.h. until all coursework is completed.

2. Students who have completed required courses and are working full-time on their Master’s Thesis may maintain full-time status by enrolling for at least 1 semester-hour of Master’s Thesis credit (Master’s Thesis–9996). The student’s advisor must certify in writing to the Graduate School that the student is working on the Thesis full time. No student may be classified as a full-time Master’s Thesis writer for more than one semester.

3. Students who have completed required courses and who are preparing the Preliminary Examination may maintain full-time status by enrolling for at least one semester hour of Preliminary Examination Preparation (9994).

4. Students who have completed the preliminary examination but who have not yet been elevated to candidacy (i.e., students who have not yet had their dissertation proposal accepted by their committee) may maintain full-time status by enrolling for at least one semester hour of 9998–Dissertation Proposal/Candidacy.

5. Students who have been elevated to candidacy (i.e., who have passed the Preliminary Examination and who have had their dissertation proposal approved) may maintain full-time status by enrolling for at least one semester-hour of Doctoral Dissertation credit (9999) during the Dissertation years. No student may be classified as a full-time Dissertation writer for more than two years. Note that the Graduate School requires that a Ph.D. student complete at least 6 credits from 9994 (Preliminary Examination Preparation), 9998 (Dissertation Proposal/Candidacy), and 9999 (PhD Dissertation Research), with at least two from 9999. Also, at least one credit of 9999 must be taken in the semester in which the Dissertation is completed and defended. Students should plan their schedules so that they are not burdened with the requirement of enrolling for multiple credits in 9999 in their final semester, when the responsibility for paying for those credits may lie with the student.

6. Clinical students on internship may maintain full-time status by registering for Internship credit during their internship year.

Students who are non-U.S. citizens can maintain full-time status by completing a confirmation of full-time status form and having it signed by the advisor before submitting it to the OIS. Forms for foreign students to maintain full-time status are available at the Graduate-School web site: http://www.temple.edu/grad/forms/index.htm

Grades in courses 9994, 9996, 9998, 9999.

If the student does not complete the preliminary examination in the semester he or she enrolls in 9994, then an R (“Registered”) is recorded as the grade and the student would enroll again in 9994. If the preliminary examination is then completed, the student will receive a grade only for the semester in which the preliminary examination is completed, and the R grade for the previous semester stays on the transcript. The credits for the R semester will not play a role in calculating the GPA. The same conditions hold for grading courses 9998 and 9999. As noted above, it should be kept in mind that the Graduate School requires that a Ph.D. student complete at least 6 credits from 9994, 9998, and 9999, with at least two credits from 9999, PhD Dissertation Research. Also, students must enroll for at least one 9999 credit in the semester in which the Dissertation is completed and defended.

In summary, a graduate student who has completed coursework and is enrolled in at least 1 s.h. of:

  • 9994 Preliminary Examination
  • 9996 Master’s Thesis
  • 9998 Dissertation Proposal
  • 9999 Dissertation Research

will automatically be classified as full-time. Contact the Graduate School about full-time status concerns only when exceptional circumstances warrant.

Students who have been elevated to candidacy are not to enroll for 9991 (Research).

A student who withdraws from the Graduate Program in good standing may apply for readmission at a later date.

VI. ENROLLMENT IN GRADUATE COURSES

A. Graduate Course Listings

Graduate Courses are listed in the University’s Graduate Bulletin

http://www.temple.edu/gradcourses/cla/gsc_d02424.htm

B. Enrollment in Graduate Courses in Psychology

1. All graduate courses in the Department are open to all graduate students in the Department who are in good standing unless otherwise noted. Courses involving direct clinical contact with clients, instruction in the practice of psychotherapy, or the discussion of confidential case material are open only to students enrolled in the Clinical Area. Courses involving the teaching of clinical assessment procedures are open to non-Clinical students only by permission of the instructor.

2. All non-matriculated students must obtain the permission of the course instructor (or designee) in order to register for any graduate course in the Department of Psychology.

3. PhD Core courses are not open to non-matriculated students, and are open to non-psychology PhD students only with instructor’s permission.

4. Students not matriculated at Temple University are allowed to take a total of not more than three (3) graduate courses in the Department except in rare instances, as approved by the Department Chair.

5. Upon the recommendation of each Area or Cluster Director, the Graduate Committee will designate certain courses for which permission of the instructor is to be required of all students. Graduate students are encouraged to consult the course schedule before registering for classes in order to determine whether registration for any desired courses requires permission of the instructor. This information is not always included in the University’s online schedule of courses; to be safe, students should consult the Department’s hard copy of the course schedule before registering.

C. Dropping/Adding or Withdrawal from Graduate Courses

Students needing to modify their course roster should follow procedures outlined by the Registrar’s office for dropping/adding a course  and withdrawal from a course (http://www.temple.edu/registrar/).The Registrar’s Office makes available an academic calendar that includes the relevant deadlines: http://www.temple.edu/registrar/documents/calendars/

D. PhD Core courses are not open to non-matriculated students, and are open to non-psychology PhD students only with instructors permission.

E.  Students not matriculated at Temple University are allowed to take a total of not more than three (3) graduate courses in the Department except in rare instances, as approved by the Department Chair.

F.  Upon the recommendation of each Area or Cluster Director, the Graduate Committee will designate certain courses for which permission of the instructor is to be required of all students. Graduate students are encouraged to consult the course schedule before registering for classes in order to determine whether registration for any desired courses requires permission of the instructor. This information is not always included in the University’s online schedule of courses; to be safe, students should consult the Department’s hard copy of the course schedule before registering.

VII. EVALUATION OF STUDENT PROGRESS

A. Student Progress.

Each Area or Cluster shall establish guidelines for the determination of satisfactory performance and progress through its Graduate program.  These guidelines are described in the individual Areas of Specialization descriptions that are included in this document. However, the following general rules apply to all graduate students in the Department of Psychology.

1. The possible grades for graduate courses are A, A-, B+, B, B-, C+, C, C-, R (as discussed in section V above), and F. The grade of D is not used at the graduate level. In cases where letter grades are inappropriate and a pass/fail system is preferred, the letter “A” will be used for passing, and “F” for failing. More than two grades below B-, or more than one grade of F, will constitute grounds for termination from the Graduate Program.

2. The Department of Psychology subscribes in full to the professional ethics guidelines of the American Psychological Association (APA) (http://www.apa.org/ethics/code.html) and the Temple University Student Code of Conduct (http://policies.temple.edu/getdoc.asp?policy_no=03.70.12 and expects all graduate students to comply with such guidelines in the conduct of research, teaching, or clinical work. Knowing violation of these guidelines may constitute grounds for termination from the Graduate Program.

3. Students shall meet with their advisor on a regular basis and with their Doctoral Advisory Committee, once formed, at least annually. It is the responsibility of the student to convene such meetings.

4. The faculty of each Area of Specialization shall meet formally every semester to evaluate each of their students. The emphasis of the evaluation is on pooling information and ideas on outstanding accomplishments, achievements, problem areas, and general progress toward fulfilling the Ph.D. requirements. Information shall be provided by the student’s primary advisor and other faculty members with direct knowledge of the student’s performance. Students who wish to contribute information concerning their progress may do so.

5. Written feedback based on the faculty discussion shall be provided to each student on at least an annual basis. Such feedback shall provide information on problematic and/or commendable performance in graduate study and indicate whether the student is making satisfactory progress toward the Degree. In cases where the Graduate Area or Cluster faculty believe that a student’s work or progress is unsatisfactory, the letter shall specify areas of deficiency, suggest a timetable and standards for subsequent evaluation of the student’s performance and progress, and specify the possible consequences of failure to satisfy those recommendations.

6. In cases in which the graduate faculty in the student’s Area of Specialization or Cluster determine that a student’s progress is especially worrisome, and where termination from the program seems to be a possible course of action, the student may be placed on probation.  The student shall be notified in writing of such action, and the letter shall explicitly note deficiencies in the student’s performance that led to the student’s being placed on probation.  The letter shall also state the accomplishments that the student must demonstrate in order to return to good standing. If, after one semester of probation, a student’s progress continues to be unsatisfactory, a warning of termination shall be communicated to the student in writing. If, after one semester following a warning of termination, a student’s progress continues to be unsatisfactory, the faculty in the student’s Area of Specialization or Cluster may recommend termination from the program. A student who has received a warning of termination should understand what actions he or she must take to remedy their situation. If there is doubt, the student’s advisor should be consulted for clarification. A student may appeal a formal action by meeting with the faculty in order to ask questions, present evidence of satisfactory progress, or provide any other information that in the student’s view might lead to a more accurate assessment and convince the faculty to reverse or alter the previous decision.

7. Recommendations for student termination shall be directed to the Graduate Committee, which will ensure that appropriate departmental procedures have been followed, vote on Area or Cluster faculty recommendations, and, in cases in which termination is recommended, notify the Graduate School of such action.

B. Policy Regarding Plagiarism

The Department of Psychology adheres to the policies of the College of Liberal Arts regarding the definition and appropriate response to plagiarism by graduate students. According to college guidelines, plagiarism includes (1) direct quotation or paraphrasing, or use of a structure of ideas, without proper credit (in general, presenting the work of others as one’s own); (2) turning in a paper or other written assignment all or part of which has been copied from a print source, downloaded from the Internet, copied from other student papers, or bought from a term paper mill; and (3) turning in the same paper for two courses without receiving approval in advance.

Graduate students are expected to familiarize themselves, as well, with appropriate APA procedures for the citation of work written or conducted by others. An example of a questionable practice is the paraphrasing of a cited source that comes too close to the original language. In these situations, the main consideration is whether the student’s act was done with the intent to deceive the reader. Repeated instances of sloppy citation or inappropriate paraphrasing may, under some circumstances, be treated as plagiarism.

If a faculty member suspects that a graduate student has committed plagiarism, the student shall be notified immediately. If, after discussing the matter with the student (in order to ascertain “intent to deceive”), the faculty member believes that plagiarism has been committed, the Chair of the department shall be notified. The Chair, in consultation with the faculty member, and the student’s Area or Cluster Director, will determine the appropriate response, which may include an academic sanction (e.g., a grade of F in the course), a disciplinary sanction (e.g., referral to the University Disciplinary Committee, the Graduate School, or the department Graduate Committee), or both. In general, the Psychology Graduate Committee recommends that a student who has committed plagiarism be issued a grade of F in the course, which, under rules described in this document, is potentially grounds for dismissal from the graduate program.

VIII. DEPARTMENTAL REQUIREMENTS FOR THE M.A. IN PSYCHOLOGY

As noted above, the Psychology Department does not admit students into a Master’s Degree program. However, Doctoral students who wish to obtain a Master’s Degree in Psychology must fulfill the following requirements.

1. Completion of 36 hours of course credit (including no more than 6 hours of research or directed readings credit) earned in the Temple University Psychology Department (or approved by the department for transfer from other institutions) that shall include successful completion of four Core Courses.

2. Completion of a written Master’s project, which takes the place of a Master’s “thesis.” The document shall be approved by a committee of at least three faculty, at least two of whom are Psychology Graduate Faculty. The format of the document should follow APA Guidelines. It does not need to be submitted to the Graduate School.

3. Download and complete the Masters Degree Confirmation form, which can be found here.

4. Have the student’s advisor sign the form, verifying that the student has met the requirements for the MA. The form is to be returned to the graduate secretary, rm. 653.

IX. ELEVATION TO CANDIDACY FOR THE PH.D.

A.  The Preliminary Examination. All doctoral students must complete and successfully defend a written Preliminary Examination before their Doctoral Advisory Committee (see below). The Preliminary Examination is a critical review and synthesis of the literature in a specific area of interest, defined in consultation with the student’s primary advisor and substantively related to the topic of the student’s Dissertation. The Preliminary Examination should be modeled after published literature reviews in the field and should be evaluated by the criteria applied to reviews that are submitted for publication in scholarly journals. The acceptability of the Preliminary Examination and its oral defense shall be determined by the Doctoral Advisory Committee. A student whose Preliminary Examination or defense is not acceptable may retake the examination. Upon passing the examination, the “Preliminary Examination Report” is signed by the Committee members. Upon review by the department Chairperson or Director of Graduate Studies, the “Preliminary Examination Report” is submitted to the College of Liberal Arts. The form is available at http://www.temple.edu/grad/forms/index.htm 

B. Elevation to Candidacy. A student is elevated to candidacy for the Ph.D. following (1) the successful defense of the Preliminary Examination; (2) acceptance of a Dissertation Proposal by the student’s Doctoral Advisory Committee; and (3) submission of the research protocol to the appropriate University Institutional Review Board (IRB) or Institutional Animal Care and Use Committee (IACUC). Students may be elevated while IRB or IACUC approval is pending. The approved proposal, with the approved IRB or IACUC form, where appropriate, must be filed with the Graduate School within 30 days of the proposal’s acceptance by the Doctoral Advisory Committee. (Students whose Dissertation research is classified as exempt from IRB or IACUC review may simply submit their approved proposal.)  The “Dissertation Proposal Transmittal Form” is available athttp://www.temple.edu/grad/forms/index.htm 

C. Scheduling Rooms for Preliminary Examinations. Scheduling rooms for Preliminary Examinations should use the following procedure:

1. Consult with your advisor. He or she may have a meeting room available. If that room is available, use it.

2. If your advisor does not have a room available, contact your Area Director. The Area Director or the Area may have a room that is available on the date you request. If so, use it.

3. If the Area Director does not have a room, he or she will be able to determine through the Departmental Google Calendar if other meeting rooms in the Department are available on the date you need. If such a room is available, use it.

4. If steps 1 through 3 are unsuccessful, contact the Graduate Coordinator. He or she will attempt to locate an available room. Be sure to give at least one week notice to locate a room, as the Graduate Coordinator may have to contact several people.

NOTE: If a projector is required for presentations, one is available in the Department for your use. Please contact the Departmental Coordinator in the main office to reserve the projector in advance.

Please do not call the College of Liberal Arts (CLA) directly to request a College room for your meeting (even for College rooms in Weiss Hall, such as WH642). The College staff is not able to help students directly in scheduling room use. They will ask you to contact the Psychology Department staff.

Hamilton Library and Conference Room is reserved for departmental and Area colloquia, job candidate talks, meetings with visiting faculty and job candidates, faculty meetings, large committee meetings, award presentations and award talks, and emergency situations. (One such emergency situation is that we need a room for a dissertation oral exam.) Only when no other options are available can we schedule Preliminary Exams or Dissertation Oral Exams in Hamilton. The fact that Hamilton Library might have been used in the past for a dissertation oral examination is irrelevant in determining whether Hamilton might be used in the future.

 

X. POLICIES CONCERNING FINANCIAL SUPPORT OF GRADUATE STUDENTS

The Department of Psychology has in the past funded all doctoral students in good academic standing through the first four years of graduate study (the “funding matrix”). This funding is not guaranteed, however, and a student’s eligibility for funding is evaluated at the end of each academic semester with respect to performance in courses, progress on major requirements, and professional development.

A. Tuition Remission

Financial support in the form of departmental assistantships is generally accompanied by tuition remission, but the department has limits on how many credits it will pay for any student who is supported by departmental funding. For non-clinical students, the Department will pay for no more than 9 credits per semester pre-candidacy, and, once the student has been elevated to candidacy, no more than the minimum number of credits required to maintain full-time status or to meet graduate-school requirements (e.g., credits required when the student is carrying out the dissertation. For clinical students, the Department will pay for no more than 12 credits per semester for the first two years of graduate study, and for no more than 9 credits per semester for the remaining years of pre-candidacy graduate study. After a Clinical student has been elevated to candidacy, the Department will pay for no more than the minimum number of credits required to maintain full-time status and to meet any graduate-school requirements.

Please note that these limits apply to how many credits the department will pay for, and not to how many credits a student may take. Students who are supported by non-departmental funds (e.g., fellowships, extramural grants) should check with the source of their funding concerning tuition remission, since policies may vary. Tuition remission may be applied to courses outside the Psychology Department only if the courses are official courses of the Graduate School. Any student wishing to take a course outside the Department and, especially, outside the College of Liberal Arts, should ensure that the specific course is cross-listed as a Graduate School course. If it is not, the student is responsible for paying the tuition.

B. Outside Employment

Graduate students receiving university support in the form of a fellowship or assistantship may be employed outside Temple only with the approval of the Department Chair and the Dean of the Graduate School. In general, the Graduate School discourages outside employment of full-time graduate students. Funded graduate students who plan to work concurrently at other jobs should discuss these plans with their advisor. If the advisor believes the work plan is appropriate, the student should notify their Area or Cluster Director in writing of the plan. (Area or Cluster Directors may request additional information about the work and/or discuss the plan at an Area meeting.)  Area or Cluster Directors will forward requests for approval to the Chair, who may forward a recommendation to the Dean of the Graduate School. The “Request for Other Employment” is available at http://www.temple.edu/grad/forms/index.htm, and should be submitted at least 21 days prior to the proposed start date of employment.

C. Financial Support and Leaves of Absence

The “Leave of Absence Request” is available at http://www.temple.edu/grad/forms/index.htm.

When a student takes a leave of absence from the Graduate Program, the Department is not able to carry over to subsequent years the funding that had been allocated for that student. As a consequence, it is not possible to guarantee that a student who returns from a leave of absence will be given the same number of years of funding as he or she would have been given had the leave not been taken. Thus, for example, a student who takes a leave of absence during his or her second year of study and who returns one year later is put into the funding matrix as a third-year student (not as a second-year student). A student who takes a leave of absence and who returns after what would have been his or her fourth year of study is considered out of the funding matrix, even if he or she had not actually received four full years of funding. The funding matrix includes all students who entered the Graduate Program within four years of the current academic year.

Although the department will make every effort to fund students for four years of graduate study, it is important that students understand that taking a leave of absence will likely affect their funding eligibility. Funding for students who entered the Program longer than four years before the current academic year (including students who have returned from a leave of absence) will be considered on a case-by-case basis after the department has met its obligations to students still in the active funding matrix.

D. Support For Graduate Student Travel To Professional Meetings

  1. Travel support will be given for paper presentations or poster presentations.
  2. The maximum amount of travel funding for an academic year for one graduate student is $350.
  3. The student’s advisor must sign off on any application for travel funds.
  4. All applications must go first to the College of Liberal Arts (CLA).
  5. If CLA does not provide $350 to support a travel application, the Psychology Department will provide support up to $350.
  6. If CLA does not support an application, the Psychology Department will support travel up to $350.
  7. If a student’s first application for travel support is funded for less than $350, the student may apply for support for another paper or poster presentation, but the total support provided in any academic year will not be more than $350.

A. Purpose

Graduate Assistantships are intended to augment graduate training by engaging students in teaching or research that contributes directly to their graduate work.  Some, but not all, Graduate Assistants’ employment is governed by a contract between the University and the Temple University Graduate Students’ Association (TUGSA). Generally speaking, employment that carries “direct educational benefit” (e.g., when a student is a Research Assistant on a project that will contribute to the student’s thesis or Dissertation research, or for which the student is receiving academic credit) is not governed by the contract, and students who will receive direct educational benefit from their employment must declare this in writing. In contrast, the employment of teaching assistants and the employment of research assistants who do not expect to derive direct educational benefit from their work is governed by the TUGSA contract. Further information on the contract may be found athttp://www.tugsa.org.

B. Eligibility

Graduate Assistants must have been admitted to the Graduate Program before beginning the assistantship, and must be enrolled full-time as defined by the Graduate School. The assistantship is terminated immediately if the student fails to enroll or fails to maintain good standing in the program.

C. Assignments

Graduate Assistants will normally be assigned to teaching duties in their home departments. Where appropriate, however, Graduate Assistants may be assigned to duties outside their home department. Graduate Assistants whose work is not governed by the TUGSA contract are expected to devote an average of 20 hours per week to their assignments, in addition to their full-time graduate studies. Graduate Assistants whose employment is governed by the TUGSA contract are expected to work in accord with the regulations specified in the contract.

D. Training and Supervision

Teaching Assistants must participate in training programs provided by the university as preparation for teaching assignments. Where appropriate to the assignment, departments may require students to participate in training offered by other departments or programs. Graduate Assistants assigned to assist faculty members in teaching must attend at least one full set of lectures in the course in which they are assisting; such required attendance may be limited to one semester for any course in which the student assists for more than one semester. Faculty members to whom Graduate Assistants are assigned must evaluate the competence and performance of the Assistants through direct observation.

E. Competence of Graduate Assistants

1. Graduate Assistants must be competent to perform their assigned tasks. If, at any time during the Assistantship, Graduate Assistants are found to be unable, unwilling, or incompetent to perform their assigned tasks, they must be replaced immediately. If such Assistants cannot be reassigned to other appropriate duties, their Assistantships should be terminated, even if the period for which the Assistantship was offered has not expired. Any actions to terminate a Graduate Assistant whose employment is governed by the TUGSA agreement must comply with the TUGSA contract.

2. Graduate Assistants must be able to communicate effectively in English. All non-native speakers of English to whom Teaching Assistantships are awarded must be tested for proficiency in English through instruments chosen by the Dean’s Office in consultation with the Graduate Committee; those students who are found to need additional training in English for effective teaching must complete the training program provided by the college to ensure English proficiency. Until such students have achieved the level of English proficiency required for teaching assignments, their duties must be restricted to those determined by the director of the College’s training program to be appropriate to their level of English proficiency. Graduate Assistants who are required to participate in such English proficiency training but who fail to progress satisfactorily will be ineligible for Assistantships until they have successfully completed the College’s training program.

F. Residence

Graduate Assistants must normally remain in residence at Temple University during the entire period for which the Assistantship was awarded. However, with approval from their departments and the Dean’s Office, Research Assistants who must perform some of their research at another institution may continue their Assistantships during a temporary absence from Temple University. Normally such absence can occur only once and cannot extend to more than one-half of one semester; exceptions to this guideline may be approved when justified by the nature of the research duties.

XII. DEPARTMENTAL OBLIGATIONS CONCERNING TEACHING ASSISTANTS

The Department, in consultation with the student’s Area of Specialization faculty, is responsible for:

1. Evaluating students’ records to determine their eligibility for awards.

2. Determining the competence of Graduate Assistants for their assignments, except in the case of English language proficiency of non-native speakers (see previous section).

3. Recommending appointments to the Dean. Departments must not represent to the student that binding offers of appointment can be made by anyone other than the Dean, and must ensure that students do not construe negotiations with the department or program as binding offers.

4. Assigning Graduate Assistants to duties consistent with Departmental and Collegial guidelines.

5. Training and supervising Teaching Assistants in accordance with the guidelines given above, and providing any other training and supervision deemed necessary by the Department.

6. Documenting evaluations of the performance of Graduate Assistants to be made available if the Assistant’s competence is challenged through student complaints.

7. Keeping complete and accurate records of all Assistantships and reporting from them such data as the Dean’s Office may require for monitoring.

8. Keeping accurate budgetary records to insure that stipends and tuition remissions do not exceed the budget allotted to the Department.

9. Distributing to Graduate Assistants copies of all documents relating to Departmental or Collegial policies on such matters as grading, attendance, withdrawals, plagiarism, research on human subjects, the Privacy Act, and others of which knowledge is expected of those assigned to teaching or research in the University.

10. Distributing to all Graduate Assistants copies of these College Guidelines, in the version compiled for Graduate Assistants

XIII. DEPARTMENTAL POLICY REGARDING STUDENTS ON FELLOWSHIP SUPPORT

A. It is expected that each student receiving a University Fellowship will use the first year of that support in the first year it is available.

B. All students in the Ph.D. Program, whether or not they are on fellowship or other non-assistantship support, are expected to be actively involved in research. During the first year, research experience will typically be obtained by assisting in a faculty member’s research project. In some cases, first year clinical students may be asked to participate in the work of the Psychological Services Center, in a way that is appropriate to their prior experience. All students are expected to work in close collaboration with a research sponsor, preferably staying with a given sponsor for at least one year. The time devoted to research in collaboration with a faculty member will vary depending upon the demands of particular situations; however, it will typically involve approximately twenty hours per week, and will seldom involve fewer than ten hours per week.

C. The non-fellowship years will typically involve support via a teaching or research assistantship.

XIV. PREPARING FOR THE DOCTORAL DISSERTATION

Preparing for the Dissertation includes the formation of a Doctoral Advisory Committee (which must include at least three members) and, at a later date, the formation of a Dissertation Defense Committee (which must include at least six members, including the members of the Doctoral Advisory Committee). For Graduate School policies and forms associated with the doctoral Dissertation, click here: http://www.temple.edu/grad/policies/gradpolicies.htm

A. Formation of the Doctoral Advisory Committee

The doctoral candidate will initiate the Dissertation process by selecting a Doctoral Advisory Committee chairperson. The candidate, in consultation with the Committee chairperson, will select the remaining Doctoral Advisory Committee members. The Doctoral Advisory Committee must be formed before the student has a Dissertation Proposal approved. The Committee supervises the development of and approves the Dissertation Proposal, and oversees the Dissertation research.  The Doctoral Advisory Committee is chaired by the student’s major advisor. It is not necessary to form a Doctoral Advisory Committee until the student is ready to begin work on the Dissertation Proposal. Approval forms can be obtained from the Departmental graduate office.

B. Composition of the Doctoral Advisory Committee

The Doctoral Advisory Committee must include at least three graduate faculty members from the Temple University Psychology Department. The Doctoral Advisory Committee may be expanded beyond three members to include other Temple graduate faculty (from inside or outside the department) and/or experts holding the doctorate or the appropriate terminal degree in their field (e.g., M.D.) from outside the University, provided that a majority of the members of the committee are members of  Temple’s Graduate Faculty. Any student who wishes to form a Committee whose composition differs from these requirements must receive approval from the Psychology Department Graduate Committee and the Dean of the Graduate School. The composition of each student’s Doctoral Advisory Committee must be approved by the Director of Graduate Studies. Once the Doctoral Advisory Committee has been formed, it may not be changed except in those cases where a committee member withdraws because of circumstances that make participation impossible. All changes in committee composition must be approved in writing by the Chair of the Department or the Director of Graduate Studies. Note that appointments of non-Temple faculty members to a Doctoral Advisory Committee must be approved by the Graduate School (See form “Nomination for Service on Doctoral Committees,” http://www.temple.edu/grad/forms/index.htm)

C. Formation and Composition of the Dissertation Defense Committee

The committee that reads the Dissertation and hears the oral defense is known as the Dissertation Defense Committee. The Dissertation Defense Committee shall consist of at least six individuals, including the Doctoral Advisory Committee plus additional graduate faculty readers, selected either from within or outside the Department. At least one reader must be from outside the Candidate’s degree program. Such an individual may be from another area within the Psychology Department (an individual holding appointments in two areas will fulfill this requirement) or from outside the department. Composition of the Dissertation Defense Committee must be approved in writing by either the Chair of the Department or the Director of Graduate Studies at least one month prior to the scheduled date of the oral examination.  Students should use the Appointment of Dissertation Defense Committee form to secure this approval. The completed form should be filed with the Graduate Coordinator.

The Dissertation Defense Committee may include individuals from outside Temple University, so long as they hold the Ph.D. or equivalent degree and have expertise in the subject area of the Dissertation, and so long as the majority of Committee are members of the Temple University graduate faculty. Any student wishing to appoint a non-Temple faculty member to his or her Dissertation Defense Committee must complete the Graduate School form, “Nomination for Service on Doctoral Committees” (http://www.temple.edu/grad/forms/index.htm) and have the nomination approved by the Department of Psychology, the College of Liberal Arts, and the Graduate School. It is not necessary to complete this form for any committee members who are members of the Temple graduate faculty.

D. Scheduling Rooms for Dissertation Oral Examinations

1. Consult with your advisor.  He or she may have a meeting room available. If that room is available, use it.

2. If your advisor does not have a room available, contact your Area Director. The Area Director or the Area may have a room that is available on the date you request.  If so, use it.

3. If the Area Director does not have a room, he or she will be able to determine through the Departmental Google Calendar if other meeting rooms in the Department are available on the date you need. If such a room is available, use it.

4. If steps 1 through 3 are unsuccessful, contact the Graduate Coordinator. He or she will attempt to locate an available room. Be sure to give at least one week notice to locate a room, as the Graduate Coordinator may have to contact several people.

NOTE: If a projector is required for presentations, one is available in the Department for your use.  Please contact the Departmental Coordinator in the main office to reserve the projector in advance.

Please do not call the College of Liberal Arts (CLA) directly to request a College room for your meeting (even for College rooms in Weiss Hall, such as WH642).  The College staff is not able to help students directly in scheduling room use.  They will ask you to contact the Psychology Department staff.

Hamilton Library and Conference Room is reserved for departmental and Area colloquia, job candidate talks, meetings with visiting faculty and job candidates, faculty meetings, large committee meetings, award presentations and award talks, and emergency situations.  (One such emergency situation is that we need a room for a dissertation oral exam.)  Only when no other options are available can we schedule Preliminary Exams or Dissertation Oral Exams in Hamilton.  The fact that Hamilton Library might have been used in the past for a dissertation oral examination is irrelevant in determining whether Hamilton might be used in the future.

E. Dissertation Format

The format of the Dissertation must follow the format approved by the Graduate School. For information on formatting, please see: http://www.temple.edu/dissertationhandbook/ 

F. Schedule for Preparation of the Dissertation for the Dissertation Oral Defense

The Dissertation Oral Defense (also called the Dissertation Defense or the Dissertation Oral Examination) involves several sets of people.  First is the candidate, who has prepared the dissertation.  Second is the dissertation advisor, who has guided the student through the research that provides the material for the dissertation and who has supervised the writing of the dissertation.  Third is the student’s Doctoral Advisory Committee (see section XIV B above; sometimes called the Core Committee), which consists of three faculty members, including the advisor, who have approved the dissertation proposal and who may have played roles during the student’s carrying out of the dissertation research.  They approve the dissertation before it can be sent to the Dissertation Defense Committee (see section XIV C above), which consists of the members of the Doctoral Advisory Committee plus three additional faculty, who read and approve the dissertation and who participate in the dissertation oral examination.  The schedule for the oral examination must provide time for all those individuals to carry out their responsibilities.

1.  The dissertation advisor first approves the written dissertation.  The candidate must provide the advisor with sufficient time to read the dissertation and must also leave sufficient time available in order to carry out any revising required by the advisor for approval of the dissertation.  The candidate, after consultation with the advisor, should provide the advisor with sufficient time to read and comment on the dissertation.  The advisor should have at least a week (5 business days; with advance warning) to read and comment on the dissertation, and the candidate should reserve at least one other week in order to carry out any revisions requested by the advisor.  The specific circumstances surrounding a particular dissertation may result in an advisor needing more time to read and comment on a dissertation.  Thus, two weeks at minimum are needed for the dissertation to be approved by the advisor.

It is also possible that, after revisions are carried out by the candidate, the advisor will not approve the document.  In that case, the student and advisor will have to work further on revising the dissertation to make it acceptable to the advisor, which may result in the Dissertation Oral Examination being postponed or re-scheduled to a later date.

Other factors may also play a role in scheduling the Oral Examination.  For example, if the student and the advisor have been working closely on the progress of the writing of the Dissertation, then the student will be able to schedule the Oral Examination with more precision than if the student and the advisor have not been in close contact during the time of the writing of the dissertation.  In the latter case, the student should be conservative in scheduling the Oral Examination, and should wait until he or she has a clear idea of the advisor’s opinion concerning the status of the dissertation.  With that information available, there will be less chance of the student having to re-schedule or cancel the Oral Examination.

2.  After the advisor has approved the dissertation, it is sent to the Doctoral Advisory Committee, who are given two weeks (10 business days) to read and comment on the document.  As with the advisor’s comments, the candidate should reserve another week to deal with revisions required by any member(s) of the Doctoral Advisory Committee.  It is also possible that, after revision has been carried out, the dissertation will not be approved by a member or members of the Doctoral Advisory Committee, in which case the student and committee member(s) must continue with revision of the document until a satisfactory version is produced.  This additional revision may result in the Dissertation Oral Examination being postponed or re-scheduled to a later date.

3.  After the dissertation has been approved by the Doctoral Advisory Committee, it is sent to the remaining members of the Dissertation Defense Committee, who should have at a minimum 10 business days to read the document in preparation for the Oral Examination.

Thus, in scheduling the Oral Examination, a minimum total of seven weeks (Advisor + Revisions = 2 weeks; Doctoral Advisory Committee + Revisions = 3 weeks; Dissertation Defense Committee = 2 weeks) is needed before the date of the Oral Examination. When a student schedules his or her examination, it is critical that that amount of time be available.  However, as noted, more time than this minimum may be needed in particular circumstances.

It should be noted again that the above requirements are minima that must be met by any Area within the Psychology Department.  Any Area is free to set more stringent requirements concerning the issues addressed in this section.  Students should examine the specific requirements for their Area (see section XVI) to ensure that there are no additional requirements that must be met in scheduling the Dissertation Oral Defense.  At the time of the outlining of the above schedule, the Clinical Area had scheduling requirements that are more stringent than those presented here, so it is imperative that Clinical students consult the Section XVI B in this Handbook (Additional Requirements for the Clinical Area) before scheduling the Dissertation Oral Defense.

G. Dissertation Oral Defense

A minimum of one month prior to the scheduled date of the oral defense, the candidate will notify the Department by turning in the “Announcement of Oral Defense” form and a copy of the Dissertation to the Department main office. Written notification of the defense will be distributed by the Department Chair to all Psychology Faculty members. All faculty members and graduate students in the Department are invited to attend the oral defense. Oral defenses also are open to the Temple University academic community, which generally includes all Presidential faculty.

The Graduate School requires a minimum of one month’s advance notice in order to schedule Dissertation Defense Examinations. Students shall notify the Psychology Department Graduate Secretary at least 30 days before the examination date, so that the department can file the necessary paperwork with the Graduate School and can post an announcement of oral defense in the Department. The form “Announcement of Oral Defense” is available athttp://www.temple.edu/grad/forms/index.htm. The Graduate School will not approve Dissertation defenses that are not scheduled in accord with this policy.

The Dissertation Defense is to be chaired by a member of the Dissertation Defense Committee, but may not be chaired by the Chair of the Doctoral Advisory Committee (the major advisor). The Chair of the Dissertation Defense Committee has no special responsibilities other than to call the meeting to order and oversee the examination process. When filing the appropriate final defense forms, the candidate should ensure that the person designated as the chair of the oral defense is not the chair of the student’s Doctoral Advisory Committee.

The oral defense constitutes an examination. The form “Certification for Acceptability of Dissertation/Thesis” is available athttp://www.temple.edu/grad/forms/index.htm.

A student will either:

  • (a) pass with distinction;
  • (b) pass;
  • (c) pass conditionally; or
  • (d) fail.

Distinction is awarded by a letter to the student from the Departmental Chair after a recommendation is received by the student’s advisor.

A student will not pass the oral defense if more than one member of the six member oral defense committee votes against passage. There are three areas in which the Examining Committee can find deficiency:

1. The research method, analysis, or theoretical exposition does not meet adequate standards of scholarship. This may require additional research, analysis, and writing. Another oral defense may be required at the discretion of the student’s committee.

2. The student has not fully analyzed or has not presented the material in a satisfactory manner. Another examination meeting may be required, or it may be possible to pass the student conditionally at the discretion of the committee. If the Dissertation has been passed conditionally, the committee will detail, in writing, the conditions that need to be satisfied for formal passage, including, if necessary, another oral defense.

3. The student’s oral defense of an acceptable Dissertation is judged inadequate. This situation would require another defense with the same committee. This second defense must occur within 90 days of the original defense.

XV. STUDENT GRIEVANCE PROCEDURES

A. Any problem with general Departmental policy should first be presented to the appropriate departmental committee or to the Graduate Committee.

B. The first step for handling a grievance a student has with a specific professor is for the student to make every effort to settle the problem with the professor directly. Students who feel they need help with this first step should feel free to consult with individuals in an appropriate student organization; with their advisor; their Area Director[] .  See also http://www.temple.edu/cla/graduate/appeals/index.html

C. If no resolution of the grievance is gained at step B, the student should meet with the Department Chair or the Director of Graduate Studies to discuss the situation in an attempt at resolution.  On the basis of information obtained from the student and professor, the Chair or Graduate Director will attempt to make specific recommendations to the student and professor regarding possible solutions. If either party is not satisfied with the chair or director’s recommendation, the department chair will appoint a grievance committee to address the problem and recommend solutions.

E. If the Grievance Committee is unable to provide such recommendations, or if the professor chooses, as is his or her prerogative, not to rely on the Committee for assistance in resolving the problem, the Committee will present a written report to the Graduate Committee of any deliberations carried out.

F. If the grievance concerns departmental policy and the student has not received satisfaction from the appropriate departmental committee, the Chair will appoint a Grievance Committee, which will collect information from the student and the relevant committee and present a formal report to the faculty for their consideration. The student will be informed of the progress of this proceeding.

G. Although the Department encourages students to attempt to resolve grievances via the procedure outlined above, students are always free to file grievances with the appropriate College or University Committees. Guidelines for such procedures may be obtained from the College of Liberal Arts or from the Graduate School.

XVI. Specific Area Requirements

A. REQUIREMENTS FOR BCS (Brain and Cognitive Sciences)

Students must fulfill all Psychology Graduate Program requirements.

1) Total required course credits: 36

2) All students must take at least one Core offered by BCS (8312 or 8712) but are strongly recommend taking both Cores. In addition, students should work with their mentors to select electives appropriate for their education.

3) Students must make substantial progress on a research project in their first year. This project should be developed in collaboration with your advisor. A presentation describing your project must be given before the last day of classes in the spring semester. The quality of the project must be such that, assuming the data are not equivocal, it can be submitted to a research journal. These presentations will normally be made during the weekly area meetings and must be presented before at least the advisor for the researcher’s project and two other faculty members from within the program. Continuation in the graduate program is contingent on successfully completing this project.

4) Preliminary exams will be completed during the 3rd year, as defined by beginning at the summer following the end of the 2nd year and ending at the last day of final exams during the 2nd semester of the third year (i.e., the students’ 6th semester). Students failing their first preliminary defense or failing to defend their preliminary exam during the 3rd year, as defined above, will automatically be put on probation and must defend their preliminary exam within 8 weeks or be asked to leave the program.

The preliminary paper and oral exam have been developed to assess students’ progress, ability to synthesize material relevant to their area of research, and ability to effectively communicate the information both in writing and orally. The topic of the preliminary paper is expected to be a topic that focuses on a student’s research. Students must submit an outline for a preliminary paper to their preliminary committee. Once the outline is approved, a signed and dated copy of the outline will be forwarded to the director of BCS. From the point at which the outline is approved, the student has 3 months to complete the preliminary paper and defend it in an oral exam. Note: this 3 month process can be initiated any time during the 3rd year as long as the defense of the preliminary exam occurs before the end of 2nd semester finals week for the 3rd year. Failure to complete the defense within 3 months will result in probation. In addition, the preliminary paper and defense must be completed by the end of the 2nd semester of the third year; failure to do so will result in probation. If probationary status is not changed by the end of the summer, the student will be dismissed from the program.

The preliminary exam will be a paper chosen from one of two models: A synthesis of existing research literature in the style of a Psychological Bulletin article, or a development of a theoretical approach to a problem in the style of a Psychological Review article (these two formats are meant as guides completion of the preliminary exam does not require submitting to
these journals). A target length for the preliminary paper is approximately 40 pages of text (range 30-50 pages doubled spaced 12 point font, not including references). Within the 3 month period, students will schedule an oral presentation and defense of their prelim. The presentation will be open to all faculty members of the psychology department. Dissertation proposal defenses will not be scheduled for the same time.

Exams will be evaluated by a committee; at least three members of this committee must be members of Temple’s Psychology Department Brain and Cognitive Sciences area. Students in their second year are expected to identify the members of this committee and meet with the committee at least once to discuss prelim exam topics, format, and submit the outline. Students can meet with committee members individually or as a group.

Students will be graded on a 4-point scale: Pass with Distinction, Pass, Marginal Pass, and Failure. A student may fail to complete the prelim requirement for two reasons. (1) He or she may not take the examination by the deadline. (2) He or she may fail the written and/or oral portion of the preliminary examination. In either case (1) or (2), the student will be placed on
probation at the semester during which he or she fails to complete the prelim requirement. Students placed on probation for failure to complete the prelim will be removed from probation on meeting the following conditions.

Case (1). The student who fails to complete the prelim by the deadline has 8 weeks from the end of that date to satisfactorily complete the prelim requirement; failure to do so will result in the student’s being dismissed from the program at the end of that 8-week period. The student who has not met the deadline for completing the prelim must within those eight weeks pass the written and oral components of the prelim examination. [Note: A student who has been placed on probation for failing to meet the deadline for completing the prelim thus will be dismissed from the program if he or she fails the written component, or the oral component, or both, of delayed preliminary examination.]

Case (2). The student who has failed one or both parts of the prelim examination must, as appropriate, either re-write the prelim paper to the satisfaction of the committee, satisfactorily complete the oral examination, or both, within 8 weeks from the date of failing the prelim. Any student who fails to pass the second exam will be asked to leave the program. Exceptions to the timetable must be requested in writing and submitted to the director of the BCS cluster, and will only be granted in exceptional circumstances.

For additional information concerning the Prelim and related issues, see
http://www.temple.edu/psychology/graduate/defending/index.htm

5) BCS’s expectations for presentations and publications are a presentation at a meeting (or submission) by the end of the 2nd year and at least one every subsequent year and a manuscript submitted by end of the 3rd year and at least one every subsequent year. Students failing to meet these standards will be put on probation with the expectation for continuation that this is resolved.

B. REQUIREMENTS FOR CLINICAL

1) Total required course credits: 36

2) Four Core Courses Completed in the First Five Semesters. Psy 8412 (Psychopathology) and Psy 8012 (History and Systems) are required of all clinical students. The remaining two core courses are to be selected from the following courses: Psy 8712 (Behavioral Neuroscience), Psy 8312 (Cognitive Psychology), Psy 8512 (Developmental Psychology), and Psy 8612 (Social Psychology).

3) Clinical Psychology Area Required Content Courses. Psy 8433 (Introduction to Clinical Psychology), Psy 8413-8423 (Psychological Assessment I and II), Psy 8411 (Cognitive and Behavioral Therapies and Empirically-Supported Therapies), Psy 9411 (Research Methods in Clinical Psychology), and Psy 8410 (Multicultural Issues in Clinical Psychology).

4) Clinical Psychology Topical Seminars. Two Clinical Psychology topical seminars (Psy 8420 or 8430) selected from offerings that vary from semester to semester (e.g., Mood Disorders, Anxiety Disorders, Developmental Psychopathology, Schizophrenia, Grant Writing). Courses with numbers other than Psy 8420-8430 will be considered as meeting this requirement only on prior petition to (and approval by) the Clinical Psychology Faculty.

5) Clinical Psychology Case Conferences. Required of all students in their first 4 years (with the exception of students who may be on community placement when Case Conferences are scheduled). Case Conferences fulfill a variety of important program functions, including meetings of the Director of Clinical Training or Clinical Faculty with the graduate student body, training in various Psychological Services Center procedures, and exposure of students to guest speakers and various topics including, but not limited to, ethical issues, multicultural and individual diversity, consultation and supervision, and training in empirically supported treatments.

6) Professional Development Seminar. Psy 8015 (Professional Development Seminar) is required of all students during the fall semester of their first year. The Professional Development Seminar is designed to provide students with information to help them excel as graduate students as well as advance their careers post-graduate school. Topics covered in this seminar include: ethical issues, mentoring (the student-faculty relationship); how to make the most of research assistantships; how to develop a line of research; how to obtain research grants, scholarships, and fellowships; how to publish empirical journal articles; issues of diversity in academia; how to search for a job post-graduate school; and the hiring process in academia.

7) Departmental Electives. Two additional elective courses must be taken outside the Clinical Psychology Area but within the course offerings of the Department of Psychology.

8) American Psychological Association (APA) Breadth Requirements. APA, which accredits the Clinical Psychology Program at Temple University, requires that students demonstrate substantial understanding of and competence in the following areas: (a) the breadth of scientific psychology, its history of thought and development, its research methods, and its applications, (b) the scientific, methodological, and theoretical foundations of practice in the substantive area(s) of professional psychology in which the program has its training emphasis, (c) diagnosing or defining problems through psychological assessment and measurement and formulating and implementing intervention strategies (including training in empirically supported procedures), (d) issues of cultural and individual diversity that are relevant to all of the above; and (e) attitudes essential for lifelong learning, scholarly inquiry, and professional problem-solving as psychologists in the context of an evolving body of scientific and professional knowledge. The large majority, but not all, of these requirements are satisfied by the specific curriculum outlined above because the curriculum allows the student some choice of courses to select. Departmental elective courses may be used to satisfy remaining breadth requirements. There are multiple courses offered by the Department of Psychology that cover these breadth areas, and students may select courses, in consultation with their advisors, as long as all of the required areas are included within their individualized program of study. Some non-classroom or individually designed activities such as independent readings, writing papers, or conducting research in the specific areas may also satisfy these requirements.

9) Clinic Teams. Students must be enrolled in a “clinic team” (Clinical Practicum; Psy 9187-9587) for each of the 4 semesters of their second and third academic years in the Clinical Psychology Program. Second year students on a clinic team receive training and experience in the assessment and psychological treatment of clients at the Department of Psychology’s Psychological Services Center. Third year students on a clinic team may similarly be placed at the Psychological Services Center, but some may be placed with the approval of the Clinical Faculty in community clinical settings. Each semester, students’ preferences for clinic team supervisors are solicited, and the Director of the Psychological Services Center and the Director of Clinical Training arrange team assignments, taking student’s preferences and past clinic team assignments into account Additional clinic team experiences are available during summers, but summer teams do not satisfy the clinic team requirement. During a student’s fourth year, arrangements may be made for an optional practicum in a community setting on the approval of the student’s advisor and the Director of Clinical Training.

10) Pre-Dissertation Research Project. This project must be completed by April 15th of the student’s 2nd year in the program. It is supervised and must be approved by a member of the Department of Psychology faculty. The student presents a synopsis of the pre-dissertation research project at a Clinical Research Day in the fall semester of the following year. Students wishing to obtain a Master’s degree prior to completing the Ph.D. may use this research as the basis for a Master’s thesis.

11) Preliminary Examination. A written paper with an oral examination is required. The paper should be a critical review and synthesis of the literature in the student’s specific area of interest, defined in consultation with the student’s primary advisor and substantively related to the topic of the student’s dissertation. It should be modeled after published literature reviews in the field and evaluated by the criteria applied to reviews that are submitted for publication to scholarly journals. The preliminary examination paper must be approved for defense by the student’s advisor and be sent to the Doctoral Advisory Committee by June 1st of any given year in order for the student to apply for an internship placement in the upcoming Fall of the following year.  The oral examination on the preliminary examination paper may take place after June 1st, but must occur by September 1st, in order to apply for internship that Fall.  The student should be enrolled in Psy 9994 (“Preliminary Examination”) in the semester of the preliminary examination completion.

12) Dissertation Proposal. A written proposal for the Dissertation research must be presented to the student’s Doctoral Advisory Committee. Like the Preliminary Examination, the Dissertation Proposal must be Approved for defense by the student’s advisor and be sent to the Doctoral Advisory Committee by June 1st of any given year in order for the student to apply for an internship placement in the upcoming Fall of the following year.  The oral examination on the dissertation proposal may take place after June 1st, but must occur by September 1st, in order to apply for internship that Fall.

13) Internship. A 2000 hour predoctoral internship is completed in the fifth or sixth year. The Internship site supplies a mid-year and end-of-year evaluation of the student, which becomes a part of his/her graduate record. A student must be continuously registered and therefore should register for 1 credit for internship during semesters when he/she is off campus. A total of 2 internship credits are required for graduation. The Clinical Psychology Program requires an internship approved by the American Psychological Association.

14) Prepration of the Dissertation and the Dissertation Oral Defense

The following schedule pertains to students in the Clinical Psychology Ph.D. Program and supercedes the minimum schedule outlined for the department as a whole.

The Dissertation Oral Defense (aka Dissertation Defense or the Dissertation Oral Examination) involves several sets of people.  First is the candidate, who has prepared the dissertation.  Second is the dissertation advisor, who has guided the student through the research that provides the material for the dissertation and who has supervised the writing of the dissertation.  Third is the student’s Doctoral Advisory Committee (see section XIV B; sometimes called the Core Committee), which consists of three faculty members, including the advisor, who have approved the dissertation proposal and who may have played roles during the student’s carrying out of the dissertation research.  They approve the dissertation before it can be sent to the Dissertation Defense Committee (see section XIV C), which consists of the members of the Doctoral Advisory Committee plus three additional faculty, who read and approve the dissertation and who participate in the dissertation oral examination.  The schedule for the oral examination must provide time for all those individuals to carry out their responsibilities.

1.  The dissertation advisor first approves the written dissertation.  The candidate must provide the advisor with sufficient time to read the dissertation and must also leave sufficient time available to carry out any revising required by the advisor prior to approval of the dissertation.  The candidate, after consultation with the advisor, should provide the advisor with sufficient time to read and comment on the dissertation.  The advisor should have at least two weeks (14 days; with advance warning) to read and comment on the dissertation, and the candidate should reserve at least one other week to carry out any and all revisions requested by the advisor and an additional week for the advisor to read and approve the revisions.  The specific circumstances surrounding a particular dissertation may result in an advisor needing more time to read and comment on a dissertation.  Thus, two weeks at minimum are needed for the dissertation to be approved by the advisor (if the advisor approves the first draft with no revisions), and up to four weeks if the advisor requires revisions.

It is also possible that, after revisions are carried out by the candidate, the advisor will not approve the document.  In that case, the student and advisor will have to work further on revising the dissertation to make it acceptable to the advisor.

Once the dissertation advisor has approved the dissertation for defense, the student may schedule his or her Dissertation Oral Defense for no less than 8 weeks after receipt of the advisor’s approval of the dissertation.

2.  After the advisor has approved the dissertation, it is sent to the Doctoral Advisory Committee, who are given three weeks (21 days) to read and comment on the document.  As with the advisor’s comments, the candidate should reserve at least another week to deal with revisions required by any member(s) of the Doctoral Advisory Committee.  It is also possible that, after revision has been carried out, the dissertation will not be approved by a member or members of the Doctoral Advisory Committee, in which case the student and committee member(s) must continue with revision of the document until a satisfactory version is produced.  If this process is very lengthy, this additional revision may result in the Dissertation Oral Examination being postponed or re-scheduled to a later date.

3.  After the dissertation has been approved by the Doctoral Advisory Committee, it is sent to the remaining members of the Dissertation Defense Committee, who should have at a minimum two weeks (14 days) to read the document in preparation for the Oral Examination.

Thus, in scheduling the Oral Examination, a minimum of eight weeks from the time of the advisor’s approval of the document is needed before the date of the Oral Examination. When a student schedules his or her examination, it is critical that that amount of time be available.  However, as noted, more time than this minimum may be needed in particular circumstances.

C.REQUIREMENTS FOR DEVELOPMENTAL

1) Total required course credits: 36

2) Core courses taken must include Developmental Psychology and History and Systems in Psychology.

3) Students must complete six didactic graduate courses, in addition to the four core courses and the two statistics courses required by the department.  At least three of these six courses must be topical seminars within the Developmental Area.

4) Students are required to carry our and complete a Predissertation research project which includes presentation of a research idea at an informal brownbag before students and faculty in the Developmental Area, generally during the Spring semester of the first year.  This is followed by a formal presentation of the completed project before Area students and faculty, generally in the Fall semester of the third year. Submission of the project for publication and/or presentation at professional meetings is recommended but not required.

D. REQUIREMENTS FOR SOCIAL

1) Total required course credits: 39

2) Core Courses. Of the four graduate core courses required by the Psychology Department, one must be the core course in Social Psychology (8612)

3) Design and Statistics Requirement. Four methodological courses (12 credits), which must include Graduate Statistics I (8011) and Graduate Statistics II (8021). Courses that will fulfill the additional two requirements in this set include:

  • Survey of Multivariate Techniques
  • Any methodological special topics course in Psychology
  • Any course in the Statistics Department (see Graduate Bulletin for listing)
  • A methodological course offered outside of Psychology or Statistics, as long as the student’s advisor and Area Director approve it.

4) Electives. A minimum of five additional didactic graduate courses in the Psychology department (15 or more credits). Graduate courses in other departments in the College of Liberal Arts are acceptable with the approval of the student’s advisor. Courses in the Fox School of Business and Management and elsewhere in the University may also be acceptable, but the student should obtain the approval of his or her advisor, the Social Psychology Area Director, and the Department’s Director of Graduate Studies before registering for those courses.

5) Directed Readings. No more than six credits of directed readings courses can be counted towards graduation.

6) Predissertation Research Projects. Students are required to engage in a series of research projects, beginning in their first year of study. Temple does not offer a terminal Master’s degree in Social Psychology. However, students are permitted to obtain a Master’s degree on their way to a PhD, and are required to complete and present research equivalent to a Master’s thesis by the end of their second year. Students should submit a proposal for their Master’s thesis to their advisor by the end of the first year of study. The thesis proposal may be related to a student’s first year project or it may represent a new project.

7) Preliminary Examination. The written preliminary examination is submitted to every faculty member in the program area for evaluation and defended orally in front of the program faculty.

8) Doctoral Dissertation. Students should form a dissertation committee and submit a formal detailed proposal to this committee early in their fourth year. The student should develop the proposal in close consultation with the members of their committee and particularly the chair.