Dr. Douglas Duckworth

Assistant Professor of Religion

douglas.duckworth@temple.edu
1114 W. Polett Walk
Anderson Hall 647
Philadelphia, Pennsylvania 19122
http://sites.temple.edu/duckworth

Keywords

Buddhism, Tibet, Philosophy, India

Biography

Douglas Duckworth earned a PhD in Indo-Tibetan Buddhism from the University of Virginia in 2005. Before coming to Temple, he taught at three universities in the US and one abroad (Kathmandu University). Since he was an undergraduate, he has spent over six years in Asia, including Nepal, India, China, and Tibet. He is the author of three books and the recipient of a Fulbright Fellowship and two summer stipends from the National Endowment for the Humanities. He is an associate editor of the Journal of Buddhist Philosophy (published by SUNY Press), and has served on steering committees at the American Academy of Religion (Buddhist Philosophy Group) and the American Philosophical Association (International Society of Buddhist Philosophy). In addition to reading, translating, and writing about Buddhist philosophy, he loves coffee and travel.

Selected Publications

Duckworth, Douglas S. Jamgön Mipam: His Life and Teachings. Boston: Shambhala Publications, 2011.

Bötrül. Distinguishing the Views and Philosophies: Illuminating Emptiness in a Twentieth-Century Tibetan Buddhist Classic. Translated, annotated, and introduced by Douglas S. Duckworth. Albany: SUNY Press, 2011.

Duckworth, Douglas S. Mipam on Buddha-Nature: The Ground of the Nyingma Tradition. Albany: SUNY Press, 2008.

Duckworth, Douglas. “Tibetan Mahāyāna and Vajrayāna.” In The Blackwell Companion to Buddhist Philosophy, edited by Steven Emmanuel. Hoboken, N. J.: Wiley-Blackwell, 2013.

Duckworth, Douglas. “Two Models of the Two Truths: Ontological and Phenomenological Approaches.” Journal of Indian Philosophy 38:5 (2010), 519-527.

Duckworth, Douglas. “Mipam’s Middle Way Through Prāsaṅgika and Yogācāra.” Journal of Indian Philosophy 38:4 (2010), 431-439.

Duckworth, Douglas. “De/limiting Emptiness and the Boundaries of the Ineffable.” Journal of Indian Philosophy 38:1 (2010), 97-105.